COVID-19 antibody test kit mailed to residents at random. (Aaron Hinks photo)

COVID-19 antibody test kit mailed to residents at random. (Aaron Hinks photo)

Antibody test kits being sent to British Columbians to measure impact of COVID-19

Stats Canada has started mailing out COVID-19 Antibody and Health Surveys to residents

Stats Canada is out for blood.

The national statistics agency has begun mailing out COVID-19 Antibody and Health Surveys, which include a request for a blood sample, to residents across the country, including B.C.

White Rock resident Evan Monk is among those who’ve received one, and shared with Peace Arch News the survey and antibody kit that arrived last week in the mail.

While he has not yet completed the survey, he said he plans to do so as he considers it his civic duty.

“Weird, I don’t remember ordering anything online,” Monk said of his initial reaction to receiving the survey in the mail.

Participants were selected at random. The purpose of the test is to estimate how many Canadians have tested positive for antibodies even if they have never shown symptoms of COVID-19. The test also serves as a way to better understand the social distancing behaviours of Canadians as well as their general health during the pandemic.

SEE ALSO: Want to know if you’ve had COVID-19? LifeLabs is offering an antibody test

“AS COVID-19 continues to disrupt daily life, we must manage its impacts and take steps to ensure Canadians can access future treatments and vaccines. To do this, it is important that we learn as much as possible about the virus, how it affects overall health, how it spreads, and whether we are developing antibodies against it,” Statistics Canada stated in literature that arrived with the kit.

The survey comes in two parts. The first part is an online questionnaire and the second is an at-home finger-prick blood test, which the participant then mails to a lab, where it will be examined for the presence of antibodies.

The test asks participants to mail their blood sample to the Public Health Agency of Canada’s National Microbiology Laboratory in Manitoba.

After the blood is processed, participants are to be informed of the result.

Tuesday, Statistics Canada media relations officer Anna Maiorino told PAN via email that, so far, 48,000 Canadians have been randomly selected to participate in the survey.

She said 22,000 packages were sent out Jan. 4, with an equal number going out at the end of the month. In B.C., 3,786 people were selected for the survey.

The survey is done in partnership with the Canadian Immunity Task Force and the Public Health Agency of Canada.

”Participants are asked to complete the electronic questionnaire for which they receive a link in their letter. They are also asked to complete the dried blood spot test. Answers to the electronic questionnaire will be useful even if a participant does not give blood. However, the questionnaire answers alone will not help us in answering the main purpose of the survey, which is to determine the prevalence of Canadians that have antibodies to COVID-19. A blood sample is necessary to determine that,” Maiorino wrote.



aaron.hinks@peacearchnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

CanadaCoronavirus

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Joyce Cooper (left) said she had to set an example for Tsilhqot’in communities by sharing her COVID-19 positive results. (Photo submitted)
Tsideldel off-reserve member documents experience of COVID-19

We should all be supporting one another and not judging each other, says Joyce Cooper

A health-care worker prepares a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at a UHN COVID-19 vaccine clinic January 7, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Employers might be able to require COVID-19 vaccination from employees: B.C. lawyer

‘An employer must make the case’ using expert science, explains lawyer David Mardiros

Interior Health reported 79 new cases of COVID-19 and two new death in the region Friday, Jan. 22, 2021. (Ben Hohenstatt/Juneau Empire)
79 new COVID-19 cases, two deaths reported in Interior Health

Both of Friday’s deaths were both recorded at long-term care homes

Esk’etemc First Nation (Alkali Lake) Chief Fred Robbins takes part in Secwepemc Health Caucus’s “Raising Our Spirits” ceremony Friday, Jan. 22. (Secwepemc Health Caucus Facebook image)
Secwepemc Nation raises spirits through song

More than 150 join virtual ceremony

Terrance Josephson of the Princeton Posse, at left, and Tyson Conroy of the Summerland Steam clash during a Junior B hockey game at the Summerland Arena in the early spring of 2020. (John Arendt - Summerland Review)
QUIZ: How much do you know about hockey?

Test your knowledge of Canada’s national winter sport

A woman injects herself with crack cocaine at a supervised consumption site Friday, Jan. 22, 2021 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Drug users at greater risk of dying as services scale back in second wave of COVID-19

It pins the blame largely on a lack of supports, a corrupted drug supply

Wet’suwet’en supporters and Coastal GasLink opponents continue to protest outside the B.C. Legislature in Victoria, B.C., on Thursday, February 27, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
‘We’re still in it’: Wet’suwet’en push forward on rights recognition

The 670-km Coastal GasLink pipeline was approved by B.C. and 20 elected First Nations councils on its path

Jennifer Cochrane, a Public Health Nurse with Prairie Mountain Health in Virden, administers the COVID-19 vaccine to Robert Farquhar with Westman Regional Laboratory, during the first day of immunizations at the Brandon COVID-19 vaccination supersite in Brandon, Man., on Monday, January 18, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Tim Smith - POOL
Top doctor urges Canadians to keep up with COVID measures, even as vaccines roll out

More than 776,606 vaccines have been administered so far

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

From the left: Midway RCMP Csts. Jonathan Stermscheg and Chris Hansen, Public Servant Leanne Mclaren and Cpl. Phil Peters. Pictured in the front are Mclaren’s dog, Lincoln and Peters’ dog, Angel. Photo courtesy of BC RCMP
B.C. Mounties commended for bringing firewood to elderly woman

Cpl. Phil Peters said he and detachment members acted after the woman’s husband went to hospital

Dr. Jerome Leis and Dr. Lynfa Stroud are pictured at Sunnybrook Hospital in Toronto on Thursday, January 21, 2021.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn
‘It wasn’t called COVID at the time:’ One year since Canada’s first COVID-19 case

The 56-year-old man was admitted to Toronto’s Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre

An Uber driver’s vehicle is seen after the company launched service, in Vancouver, Friday, Jan. 24, 2020. Several taxi companies have lost a court bid to run Uber and Lyft off the road in British Columbia. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Taxi companies lose court bid to quash Uber, Lyft approvals in British Columbia

Uber said in a statement that the ruling of the justice is clear and speaks for itself

A 75-year-old aircraft has been languishing in a parking lot on the campus of the University of the Fraser Valley, but will soon be moved to the B.C. Aviation Museum. (Paul Henderson/ Chilliwack Progress)
Vintage military aircraft moving from Chilliwack to new home at B.C. Aviation Museum

The challenging move to Vancouver Island will be documented by Discovery Channel film crews

Most Read