No job like it: 100 Mile Fire and Rescue issues the call for new recruits

100 Mile House Fire Chief Roger Hollander is issuing the annual call for new paid on-call firefighters for 100 Mile House Fire and Rescue.

100 Mile House Fire Chief Roger Hollander is issuing the annual call for new paid on-call firefighters for 100 Mile House Fire and Rescue.

If you’re looking for rewarding, part-time work that lets you gain invaluable skills while making a significant difference in your community, 100 Mile House Fire Chief Roger Hollander has the job for you!

Hollander is issuing the annual call for new paid on-call firefighters for 100 Mile House Fire and Rescue.

Featuring a mix of classroom education and hands-on learning at the 100 Mile House fire training centre, initial training lasts about two months – Wednesdays and some weekends, until recruits “are safe enough to be assigned a pager to come on duty with us,” Hollander says.

Beyond firefighting, 100 Mile House firefighters are also first responders, and assist with medical emergencies and motor vehicle incidents and other scenarios.

Beyond firefighting, 100 Mile House firefighters are also first responders, and assist with medical emergencies and motor vehicle incidents and other scenarios.

Ongoing training continues Wednesday evenings for everyone, and after two to three years, new firefighters are certified to a National Fire Protection Association 1001 standard.

Beyond firefighting – including structure, vehicle and interface fires – 100 Mile House firefighters are also first responders, and assist with medical emergencies and motor vehicle incidents and other scenarios. That means that in addition to firefighting skills, firefighters also earn certifications like first aid, a first responder ticket and a Class 3 driver’s license.

“It’s really like no other job,” Hollander says. “You learn so many practical life skills and for many people, it’s about helping their neighbours, especially in a smaller community like ours.”

Applicants must be at least 18 years old, have a valid driver’s license and a vehicle, and live in the 100 Mile House region. They must also undergo a criminal record check and have their COVID-19 vaccines.

Beyond those specific requirements, Hollander is looking for men and women who can commit time to training and ongoing weekly practice and to answering the call when needed, and bring a good attitude toward the team environment. “Our people really appreciate the great camaraderie here,” Hollander says. “After all, none of our calls can happen by ourselves.”

In return, successful firefighters will enjoy truly rewarding part-time work with a family of like-minded individuals committed to making a difference in their community, at times when their friends and neighbours need them most.

“When we go out on a call, there’s real and immediate gratification in knowing you’ve helped someone,” Hollander says.

As a paid on-call department, 100 Mile House firefighters receive a stipend of between $15 and $26 per hour they’re called out, with a minimum of one-hour call-out pay during the day and at least two hours between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. All training and practice times are also paid, Hollander notes.

To learn more about becoming a 100 Mile House firefighter, call Fire Chief Roger Hollander at 250-395-2152 or review the recruit application book here.

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