Dock Currie was withdrawn as the NDP candidate. Submitted photo.

Dock Currie was withdrawn as the NDP candidate. Submitted photo.

Social media comments leave Kamloops-Thompson-Nicola riding without NDP candidate

Dock Currie asked to step down

For the second time, the NDP is without a candidate in the Kamloops-Thompson-Cariboo riding, with the party withdrawing support for Dock Currie.

“I have been asked to step down as a result of problematic social media engagement two years ago, made in a context in which I was a graduate student without any designs on public life,” Currie posted on Facebook.

Gina Myhill-Jones, originally selected as the NDP candidate, stepped down in early August because of personal reasons.

Currie was announced as the candidate just last week.

He released the following statement:

Brothers and sisters in the fight for the interests of working class Canadian families, First Nations peoples, LGBTQ2S peoples, and marginalized peoples, it is with a heavy heart that I write to you to inform you that I have been asked to, and have agreed to, withdraw my candidacy for NDP MP for Kamloops-Thompson-Cariboo.

I am incredibly disappointed that I won’t be able to be the voice to offer a social democratic alternative to the Liberals and Conservatives in the riding of Kamloops-Thompson-Cariboo. I am not stepping down for personal reasons. Rather, I have been asked to step down as a result of problematic social media engagement two years ago, made in a context in which I was a graduate student without any designs on public life. The comments I made then were flippant and aggressive, and do not reflect who I am today, nor do I stand by them in the form in which they were made, and I understand completely that they would be an unnecessary and unwarranted distraction from the vital message and campaign of the NDP across the country.

I absolutely support, endorse, and believe in the NDP’s New Deal for People and Power to Change policy documents. We live in a moment of crisis, and the only party with policy prescriptions that both resonate with everyday Canadians and can address the massive disparities and contradictions in wealth, housing, healthcare and reconciliation is Canada’s New Democratic Party. I am truly and deeply sorry to my friends, neighbours, colleagues, fellow party members, and citizens across Canada that I cannot and will not be the champion for these policies, as much as I wanted to and want to be.

I want also to make clear that while I regret and apologize for the comments I made to two pro-pipeline activists two years ago, and understand how they would be a needless distraction to the party and national campaign, I nonetheless disagree with both the content and process of the decision that prevents me from championing these policies that I deeply and passionately believe in. The run-up to this campaign has been marked by questions around the nature, purpose, and procedures of candidate vetting, in all parties, and how social media plays a role in who can, and cannot, take part in political life. If all those who advance the interests of the wealthy and powerful need do to stymie and sabotage a campaign or candidate is to unearth an uncouth statement, or make a political party answer for any out of context social media engagement, then that is exactly what they will do, and become better at doing.

With that said, as the Ontario Labour activist Sid Ryan has already noted, the issue of candidate vetting, what it consists of, and who makes decisions concerning it “will need to be addressed in a serious way following the election [but] meanwhile, we have work to do to elect Jagmeet Singh and his team of candidates.” With this I wholeheartedly agree. There will be plenty of time for analysis and questions after the election campaign has ended, as we survey the political scene that we will have to live with for several years.

Right now, I encourage all Canadians across the country to get involved with the campaigns of all the great local candidates for the NDP, inspiring individuals who passionately advocate for policies that will materially better the lives of the communities we live in, and get them into Parliament. I am incredibly sorry that I will not be among them.

I am humbled, grateful, and inspired by the local Kamloops-Thompson-Cariboo labour activists, campaign volunteers, and electoral district association members who put their trust in me, and it will forever sit uncomfortably with me that I could not be their candidate.

In love and solidarity always,

Dock Currie

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

BC Wildfire Service crew member Josh Hutchinson participated in a controlled burn above the Williams Lake Stampede Grounds on Tuesday, April 20 that was conducted in concert with the Williams Lake Fire Department. It was a good weather day for the burn, as on Wednesday, April 21, the BCWS is urging caution, with strong winds in the forecast Wednesday and Thursday for the region. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
Cariboo Fire Centre urges caution against outdoor burning due to strong winds forecast

Public, industry asked to consider postponing burning until calmer weather

Cathy McLeod (File Photo)
McLeod disappointed with first federal budget in two years

The 2021 Federal Budget released Monday, April 19 is “disappointing and politically opportunistic,”

A two-hectare fire is burning between Canim Lake and Hawkins Lake. (Photo submitted).
Homeowners urged to be cautious with outdoor burning

Multiple fires, tinder-dry conditions good reminders to be vigilant.

B.C. Finance Minister Selina Robinson outlines the province’s three-year budget in Victoria, April 20, 2021. (B.C. government video)
B.C. deficit to grow by $19 billion for COVID-19 recovery spending

Pandemic-year deficit $5 billion lower than forecast

A syringe is loaded with COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination clinic run by Vancouver Coastal Health, in Richmond, B.C., Saturday, April 10, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
67 new cases of COVID-19 in Interior Health

Thirty people in the region are hospitalized with the virus, 11 of whom are intensive care

A large crowd protested against COVID-19 measures at Sunset Beach in Vancouver on Tuesday, April 20, 2021. (Snapchat)
VIDEO: Large, police-patrolled crowds gather at Vancouver beach for COVID protests

Vancouver police said they patrolled the area and monitored all gatherings

Police road checks are coming for people travelling between regions while COVID-19 travel restrictions are in place. (Black Press file photo)
B.C. clarifies COVID-19 travel restrictions, Lower Mainland a single zone

Vehicle checks on highways, at ferry terminals to start Friday

Canadian driver Paul Tracy pulls out of the pits during the morning session at the Molson Indy in Vancouver, B.C., Saturday, July 26, 2003 (CP/Richard Lam)
Vancouver is considering hosting a Formula E race using electric cars

The race would be part of a three-day event focused on climate and sustainability

Chart from the April 20 B.C. budget shows sharp dip in real estate sales early in the COVID-19 pandemic and the even steeper climb since late 2020. (B.C. government)
Hot B.C. housing market drives property transfer tax gains

B.C. budget boosts tobacco, sweet drinks, carbon taxes

President Joe Biden holds a virtual bilateral meeting with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
U.S. to help Canada with more COVID-19 vaccine supply, Biden says

The U.S. has already provided Canada with about 1.5 million doses of the AstraZeneca vaccine

B.C.’s 2021 budget is trending in the right direction to support farmers, says the BC Fruit Growers’ Association. (Phil McLachlan - Capital News)
BC Fruit Growers’ Association gives thumbs up to provincial budget

BCFGA general manager said budgetary investments put farming industry on a good trajectory for recovery

B.C. Finance Minister Selina Robinson leaves the assembly with Premier John Horgan after the budget speech Tuesday, April 20, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
Paid sick leave for ‘hard-hit’ workers left out of provincial budget: BCGEU

‘For recovery to be equitable it requires supports for workers, not just business,’ says union president Laird Cronk

In this image from video, former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin, center, is taken into custody as his attorney, Eric Nelson, left, looks on, after the verdicts were read at Chauvin’s trial for the 2020 death of George Floyd, Tuesday, April 20, 2021, at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis, Minn. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Court TV via AP, Pool
George Floyd’s death was ‘wake-up call’ about systemic racism: Trudeau

Derek Chauvin was found guilty Tuesday on all three charges against him

Most Read