Netflix doesn’t want to pay into Canadian Media Fund

Being forced to pay into funds is discriminatory, company says

Netflix says it shouldn’t be forced to pay into funds that are designed to support the creation of Canadian content, arguing that the country is better served by market competition than by regulating foreign online services.

The California-based company makes the argument in a submission to a government-appointed expert panel that will make recommendations for changing Canada’s laws governing broadcasting and telecommunications.

“Numerous online distributors offer an abundance of content, including Canadian content, on demand, anywhere and any time to anyone with access to the open internet,” the Netflix submission says.

“We do not subscribe to the theory that a “regulated investment” is more valuable than a consumer and market-driven one.”

RELATED: VIDEO — Netflix Canada plans biggest price hike yet as rivals step up

The 30-page submission, made public Friday, says Netflix is on track to “significantly exceed” a $500-million commitment to fund original content made in Canada under a five-year agreement announced in 2017.

The paper, dated Jan. 11, is one of many submissions to the expert panel, which is expected to complete its review by Jan. 31, 2020 — after the next federal election in October.

Although the panel hasn’t made the full collection of submissions public, some groups have released theirs — often in support of positions that have been made in previous public debates.

Stephane Cardin, Netflix director of public policy, said Friday that the company decided to release its position paper ahead the 2019 Prime Time conference next week, when it will be on a panel with groups that had disclosed their positions.

Netflix argues that foreign online services such as itself would face unfair discrimination if it’s forced by law to pay into the Canadian Media Fund, which it says currently denies it the same rights as Canadian-owned broadcasters and distribution companies.

“For certified CanCon, the Canadian broadcaster obtains “first-window” rights in Canada while Netflix, or another online service, gets international rights outside Canada and possibly second-window rights in Canada,” it says.

If foreign online services are required to contribute to the CMF without getting “first window” rights in Canada, Neflix says, it would be discriminatory.

“It would also effectively force foreign online services to subsidize Canadian broadcasters, and reinforce the market power of vertically-integrated incumbents.”

Alternatively, it says, if foreign services had equal access to the CMF “they would be drawn into competing with Canadian broadcasters or VOD services for the Canadian first window rights for publicly funded original Canadian content.”

When asked by The Canadian Press whether Netflix was calling for an end to the Canadian Media Fund, where Cardin was a vice-president for 12 years, he was unequivocal.

“Absolutely not,” he said. “We do not say that, nor do we advocate for it.”

Netflix noted that it faces increased competition from other foreign and Canadian video-on-demand services, including Bell Media’s Crave subscription service, and the newer ad-supported CTV Movies and CTV Throwback.

The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, which receives funding from the federal government and advertisers, has also launched its new Gem online service to provide live and on-demand programming.

Netflix said it’s not trying to get special treatment under Canadian tax laws, and noted it will begin collecting and remitting a Quebec sales tax in January 2019.

“We will comply with tax laws if and when they legally are extended to services like Netflix,” it says.


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Starry Nights purchases $16,000 Nordic wellness chair for long-term care centre

The chair reclines, rocks, plays music, and has programs for relaxation, anxiety and restlessness

Canim Lake Band native discovers passion for pow wow regalia

‘It’s a spiritual gift and every child should have the opportunity to dance’

Easter Egg Hunt returns to 100 Mile House

The 100 Mile Free Press and Canlan Sports team up for chocolate egg hunt

Historic building in Alexis Creek destroyed by fire overnight

“If it hadn’t been a heavy rain last night we could have lost many houses in the area”

Mile 108 Elementary myth busters take home awards at Cariboo Mainline Regional Science Fair

Kaitlyn Piccolo won awards for her project, which tested how music affects the plant growing process

Sri Lanka invokes war-time military powers after nearly 300 killed in Easter bombings

Sri Lanka’s minister of tourism says 39 foreign tourists were killed in the Easter Sunday attacks

Bodies of 3 mountain climbers recovered after last week’s Banff avalanche

The men disappeared while attempting to climb the east face of Howse Peak in the Icefields Parkway

Happy birthday: Queen Elizabeth II turns 93 on Easter Sunday

Sunday is the first of two birthday celebrations each year for the queen

RCMP confirm witnesses say body found at Kelowna’s Gyro Beach

Police tape is blocking part of the beach and several RCMP officers are on scene.

B.C. fire department rescues kittens

Enderby homeowner not aware kittens in wood pile near garbage pile fire that got out of hand

QUIZ: How much do you know about Easter?

Take this short quiz and put your knowledge to the test

B.C. VIEWS: NDP’s lawyer show is turning into a horror movie

Court actions pile up over pipelines, car insurance, care aides

Global Affairs warns Canadians in Sri Lanka there could be more attacks

A series of bomb blasts killed at least 207 people and injured hundreds more

Most Read