National Kitten Day aka the ‘purrfect’ day to foster a new friend

National Kitten Day aka the ‘purrfect’ day to foster a new friend

July 10 marks National Kitten Day, a special day to celebrate all things kittens

Kittens! Who doesn’t love adorable fluffy kittens?

Their playful and firey like charm makes them irresistible, and let’s not get started on their giant like eyes and paws they have yet to grow into.

With that said, July 10, of every year marks National Kitten Day, a day intended to remind us that while kittens are well equipped to find their way into our hearts, many don’t find homes. Often kittens are either abandoned on the road, left wild and feral, or forgotten at a shelter.

National Kitten Day was founded by Colleen Paige, pet and family lifestyle expert, author and animal advocate. Paige wanted a day to highlight the fight kittens face in shelters and to encourage safe adoption. In light of the recent restrictions the pandemic has sprung on the world, more people are spending longer hours at home making it the perfect or should we say ‘purr-fect’ time to gain a companion which would make a difference in a kitten’s life.

READ MORE: Box of kittens found on median of busy B.C. street

Instead of purchasing a kitten from the pet store this year, adopt from a shelter.

How to get started:

  1. Call your local shelter or animal welfare organization and complete necessary forms and background checks.
  2. Some organizations may provide financial support for foster parents, while others may not be offering support at this time due to COVID-19.

Before:

  1. Involve the whole family in the fostering conversation. Will kids be responsible for feeding the new ‘roommate’? How will your family tolerate future adoption? Do your current pets tolerate other animals OK? The new pet is a big change for everyone, so allow everyone to weigh in, and suggest how they would like to help care for the pet.
  2. Adjusting to a new environment can be a daunting task for new pets. Many animals can jump onto high surfaces or squeeze into the smallest of spaces. To protect foster pets in a new environment and to safeguard your belongings, it’s recommended to animal-proof your entire house. Pay attention to any small or dangerous objects, such as pins, needles, paper clips, nails, staples, thread, string, rubber bands, caustic/toxic chemicals, mothballs, plants, and any other potentialy dangerous items.

After:

  1. Make sure your pet is up-to-date on vaccinations. Many infectious diseases for pets are preventable through vaccinations, including Canine Influenza, Leptospirosis (which can be transmitted to people) and Lyme.

  2. Pets at varying ages have different nutrient requirements, so consider assessing your pet’s food and adjust accordingly.

  3. It is recommended to professionally groom your pet every four to six weeks. While that may not be possible at the moment, between salon appointments, use at-home grooming tools such as a cat or dog-specific toothbrush and specially formulated toothpaste, a nice rubber brush to help de-shed and invigorate the skin and coat, ear cleaner and cotton balls to gently cleanse the ears, and wipes for cleaning around the face, mouth and eyes.

If you’re interested in learning more, visit PetSmart Charities.

READ MORE: Video: Okanagan kittens rescued from landfill available for adoption

Adoption

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

A power outage Thursday night left nearly 3,000 homes in Clinton and the 70 Mile areas in the dark. (Katie McCullough photo).
Updated: Clinton, 70 Mile left in the dark after vehicle crashes into transmission pole

BC Hydro still working to restore power to 330 homes in 70 Mile House

A woman wearing a protective face mask to curb the spread of COVID-19 walks past a mural in Victoria, B.C., on Monday, Dec. 7, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Marissa Tiel
115 new COVID-19 cases, no new deaths in Interior Health

There are now a total of 4,970 cases in the region

Students Jasfia, left, and Junaya Nielsen volunteer at Peter Skene Ogden Secondary's breakfast program. (Lauren Keller photo - 100 Mile Free Press).
Breakfast is served at PSO

The program is in its second year.

A woman wears a face mask and shield to curb the spread of COVID-19 while walking in North Vancouver, B.C., on Wednesday, January 6, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
536 COVID cases, 7 deaths reported as B.C. finds its first case of South African variant

Henry said 69,746 people have received their first dose of the COVID vaccine.

Jobs Minister Ravi Kahlon shared a handwritten note his son received on Jan. 13, 2021. (Ravi Kahlon/Twitter)
Proud dad moment: B.C. minister’s son, 10, receives handwritten note for act of kindness

North Delta MLA took to Twitter to share a letter his son received from a new kid at school

Black Press media file
Port McNeill driver tells police he thought the pandemic meant no breathalyzers

Suspect facing criminal charges after breathalyzer readings in excess of 3.5 times the legal limit

Forestry companies in B.C. agree to abide by the cedar protocols based on traditional laws of the First Nation members of the Nanwakolas Council. (Photo courtesy, Nanwakolas Council)
Landmark deal sees B.C. forest firms treat big cedars like a First Nation would

Western Forest Products, Interfor among companies to adapt declaration drafted by Nanwakolas Council

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

A northern resident killer whale shows injuries sustained by a collision with a vessel in B.C. waters. (Photo supplied by Ocean Wise Conservation Association)
Coast Guard ramps up protections for B.C. whales

First-ever Marine Mammal Desk will enhance cetacean reporting and enforcement

Two toucans sit on tree at an unidentified zoo. (Pixabay.com)
BC SPCA calls for ban on exotic animal trade after 50 parrots, toucans pass through YVR

One toucan was found dead and several others were without food

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau listens to a question during a news conference outside Rideau cottage in Ottawa, Friday, January 8, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Trudeau says Canada’s COVID vaccine plan on track despite Pfizer cutting back deliveries

Canadian officials say country will still likely receive four million doses by the end of March

Most Read