Photo provided by Jennifer Lee.

Get to know Duke of Edinburgh’s Award recipient Jennifer Lee

Big adventures in the Canadian wilderness, public speaking, swimming, and more

Jennifer Lee’s journey to achieve the silver level of The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award has led her to big adventures from her hometown in Burnaby.

“One of my proudest moments was standing on the summit of the Chilkoot Pass,” Lee told Black Press Media.

She remembers standing on the edge of the Coast Mountain range in the Yukon thinking,“Wow, I’ve come this far and I can see this huge expanse of wilderness in front of me.”

Lee wanted to chase the summit to learn more about the people who’d hiked it during the Klondike Gold Rush.

She enjoyed the trail’s historical significance and saw a variety of interesting artifacts, such as a boiler.

“Somebody thought they could carry a boiler over the mountain range and very quickly realized that was not going to happen.”

And her journey isn’t over.

She plans to canoe the Yukon River and “continue to be a better Canadian” to achieve the award’s gold level.

Lee also worked on her public speaking skills with Toast Masters, volunteered at a seniors’ home, developed her endurance for swimming, and practised playing her guitar during the program.

To be eligible for the award, youth ages 14-24 must fulfill four different activities over at least one year: service to the community, development of a skill, physical recreation, and an adventurous journey in nature.

It’s divided into three levels – bronze, silver, and gold – and comes with a lapel pin, certificate, and school credit.

More than 15,000 youth participate in the program in B.C. and Yukon, and are mentored by almost 1,000 volunteers through schools, community centres, and youth organizations.

To learn more about the Duke of Edinburgh Award, click here.



baneet.braich@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

RCMP put down two dogs after woman attacked

The woman suffered serious injuries to her left arm, which include a broken left lower arm.

South Cariboo senior living residence announces expansion due to high demand

Carefree Manor suspects the expansion to be finished later in 2020.

Fuel Management is a priority for 100 Mile Community Forest

The organization is pioneering the use of a normal cutting permit process to create fuel breaks

CRD develops internal policy for single-use plastics for its own operations

Chair Margo Wagner said the CRD is proud to be taking steps to reduces its environmental footprint

Rents in most Canadian cities are unaffordable for lower-income earners: study

Roughly one-third of households, or 4.7 million, are renters

Rare white ravens spotted again on Vancouver Island

Nature photographer Mike Yip said mysterious birds back in Coombs area

B.C. government seeks advice on reviving Interior forest industry

Public website opens as meetings start with community leaders

Psychics, drones being used to search for missing Chilliwack woman with dementia

Drones, psychics, dogs and more have been employed to help find Grace Baranyk, 86

B.C. mom to go to Europe court in hopes of getting alleged abducted daughter back

Tasha Brown alleges her estranged wife abducted their daughter Kaydance Etchells in 2016

‘Benzos’ and fentanyl a deadly cocktail causing a growing concern on B.C. streets

Overdoses caused by benzodiazepines can’t be reversed with opioid-overdose antidote naloxone

Scheer on Trump: It’s ‘offensive’ to question the family background of critics

Trump is being called a racist for saying that the four congresswomen should go back where they came from

Instagram expands Canadian pilot removing ‘like’ counts to more countries

Social media giant plans to roll out the test in Australia, New Zealand, Brazil, Japan, Italy and Ireland

Pamela Anderson adds star power to B.C. Green Party town hall

Celebrity attended Nanaimo meeting with representatives from U.S.-based environmental group

Most Read