We’re a far cry from justice seen to be done

The weekly editorial for the 100 Mile Free Press

In ancient Rome, consuls (the highest elected political office) and governors had legal immunity. Essentially, governors and consuls were above the law for the duration of their governance. This ultimately led to a massive civil war with one faction led by Julius Caesar and another by Pompey the Great. If you’ve been following the news, this may sound eerily familiar as some Republicans have, in various ways, floated the idea that the U.S. president is above the law.

Now, furthermore, there are a whole bunch of questions floating around as to whether U.S. Attorney General William Barr is trying to cover up the findings of the Mueller report. Consequently, there’s all kinds of partisan back and forth (much like in ancient Rome). There are also many other lingering questions, such as those surrounding Trump’s tax returns.

It’s pretty clear that things in the U.S. are a mess. Some Canadians may even experience some schadenfreude over the situation down there.

Meanwhile, in Canada, we have our own political scandal going on, but at least the outward perspective is that it’s far less of a mess. There’s been no debate as to whether Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is above the law, there’s been no debate over whether a report conducted by a generally considered independent third-party was covered up or not.

Instead, we’ve got something worse. We’ve got serious allegations of wrongdoing against a Liberal Prime Minister, being investigated by an 11-person committee, seven of whom are Liberal. Subsequently, when Jane Philpott was kicked out of the Liberal party (along with Jody Wilson-Raybould), and complained that they were ejected unilaterally and without due process, Liberal Party speaker Geoff Regan said it was out of his jurisdiction.

So there you go. Canadians can rest assured there’s nothing to see here. Everything is perfectly in order (sarcasm).

There’s a famous case in the English justice system (keep in mind that the Canadian legal system has its foundation in the English common law system), called R v Sussex Justices, ex parte McCarthy, from which we get the often quoted “Not only must Justice be done; it must also be seen to be done.”

It’s hard to argue that justice is currently seen to be done in either the U.S. or Canada, but at least in the U.S. they’re several steps closer, having at least conducted an ostensibly impartial investigation. It doesn’t seem we’ll make it even that far in Canada.


newsroom@100milefreepress.net

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

What does Family Day mean to you?

Jens Lundsbye 100 Mile House “It means spending the day together with… Continue reading

Preparing for climate change focus of upcoming workshop in Williams Lake

NStQ communities, licensees, local governments and interested people invited to share ideas

From the archives of the 100 Mile Free Press

40 YEARS AGO (1980): 108 Mile Ranch was to become the first… Continue reading

Sugary drink tax could use some work

The weekly editorial for the 100 Mile Free Press

RCMP release photos of a suspect following two break-and-enters at a 100 Mile business

The 100 Mile RCMP responded to a report of two break-and-enters that… Continue reading

Governor general says multiple solutions needed for ‘complicated’ overdose issue

Julie Payette met at a fire hall with firefighters and police officers as well as politicians and health experts

Still six cases of COVID-19 in B.C. despite reports of Air Canada passenger: ministry

Health ministry wouldn’t comment on specific flight routes

Violent ends to past Indigenous protests haunt Trudeau government

Trudeau adopted a more assertive tone Friday, insisting the barricade must come down

HIGHLIGHTS: Day one and two at the 2020 BC Winter Games

Athletes had sunny – but cold – weather to work with in Fort St. John

B.C. money laundering inquiry to begin amid hopes for answers, accountability

Eby argued that most B.C. residents already know the previous government, at best, turned a blind eye

Blockades remain in place as Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs returning to B.C.

Hereditary Chief Woos said they are ready to engage in nation-to-nation talks with the B.C.

Tyler Toffoli scores twice, Canucks crush Bruins 9-3

Stecher, Miller each add three points for Vancouver

Most Read