Snowball fights should be allowed

The weekly editorial for the 100 Mile Free Press

Recently, some students in School District 27 got in trouble following a snowball fight.

Indeed some schools within the district, specifically forbid snowball fights in their handbook or rules of conduct.

Obviously, snowball fights have a dangerous component, there’s no real dispute there.

I’m sorry but there are a number of reasons to allow snowball fights outside of the activity being as Canadian as beavers, toonies and Tim Hortons.

By forbidding the activity altogether, clearly, schools are trying to avoid legal responsibility in case something goes wrong. However, what it also does is forgo teaching children to take responsibility for their own actions. Rather, the only thing children are likely to learn from the ban is that snowball fights are an activity they’re not allowed to do at school.

Teaching children responsibility for their actions should primarily fall to the parents, but the school setting provides the unique opportunity of a very large social gathering that, especially in rural areas such as School District 27, parents may not frequently experience with their children.

As evidenced in the most recent case of what seems to be an otherwise excellent group of students participating in a snowball fight, it’s something students are going to do regardless. Even if they’re wise enough not to do so at school, they’re likely to do so after school when there may be less supervision or immediate help in the event that something should go wrong.

If rather than an outright ban, we asked students, under the guidance of a teacher, to come up with rules instead (i.e. don’t throw at students who don’t want to play, don’t throw at other students’ heads, don’t throw snowballs with rocks or sticks), it’s hard to see how it would be more dangerous than playing softball where students throw a firm ball at other students.

Additionally, it would keep them safer if they engage in snowball fights outside of the school setting.

It would also teach them that if they get an idea for a new game or activity, and that game or activity is not covered by the current school bans and has a greater potential for injury than a snowball fight, that they should stop and think first about what rules they can come up with to make sure that new game or activity is safe to play.

Snowball fights being banned outright is doing our children and students a disservice just to avoid any legal responsibility.

Just Posted

Masquerade party coming to 100 Mile

There will be a $100 prize for best costume

Starry Nights fundraiser will support Outreach Cystoscopy Program

The South Cariboo Health Foundation’s annual light display will return this November

South Cariboo business wins national innovation contest

‘I learned that there was a lot of people out there like me’

ELECTION 2019: It’s so close, it could come down to who turns out to vote

Black Press Media’s polling analyst on the origins of predictive seat modelling in Canada

Jack’s Devils beat Quinn’s Canucks 1-0 in NHL brother battle

New Jersey youngster scores first career goal against Vancouver

Two charged after owner’s wild ride through Kamloops in his stolen truck

Crystal Rae Dorrington, 37, and Derrick Ronald Pearson, 32, facing multiple charges

Judge orders credit union’s bank records for Kelowna social worker facing theft allegations

The man is accused of negligence, breach of contract, fraud and a conspiracy with Interior Savings

Leaders pour it on with rallies, boosts for candidates as campaign reaches peak

The federal election campaign has reached a crescendo

Allegations of racism lead to ministry investigation at Vancouver private school

St. George’s School was contacted over what the school describes as ‘deeply offensive behaviour online’

Not a political question: Thunberg calls for climate action in Alberta

Edmonton police estimated the size of the crowd at about 4,000

Zantac, the over-the-counter heartburn drug, pulled in Canada, U.S.

Health Canada also investigates possible carcinogen in some ranitidine drugs

B.C. public safety minister says cannabis edibles not in stores til January

Mike Farnworth says he wants regional issues considered when it comes to licensing

Most Read