Is Greyhound abandoning the north?

A letter to the editor of the 100 Mile Free Press from Victoria Manson

To the editor:

I am writing regarding the possible cancellation of the Greyhound to Northern British Columbia and Yukon communities in the coming months. The Prince George to Prince Rupert run includes the “Highway of Tears.” Travelling from Prince George to Dawson Creek, Fort Nelson and Whitehorse has much historical merit, involving the “Great White North.”

The impact of this decision is going to be a hardship for those in the smaller cities and townships. They will become even more isolated, especially between Valemont to Prince George, Prince Rupert, Fort St. John, Whitehorse, etc. Some who don’t have access to train or air travel; students and seniors who can’t afford other travel methods or those that are unable to drive themselves.

Not everyone can connect to train or plane service for travel south, involving trips concerning business, medical, education or pleasure. Much of this province’s wealth and economy is realized in the north. We appreciate living up here and enjoying what the area has to offer. It is a shame this valuable service is going to be reduced to the bare bones.

I can understand the financial side of this picture, however, surely something can be worked out to allow present and future bus clients continuation of this transport system.

I have travelled Greyhound regularly since 1974 to the present, all around Southern, Central and Northern B.C. and Alberta, for short two to three hour trips or long hauls of 15 to 24 hours. Your drivers have been skilled, courteous, very helpful — and some even have a wicked sense of humour!

There has never been any worry or trepidation when climbing aboard to leave on my many trips, during any and all Canadian seasons. I have also used your buses for shipping freight throughout B.C. and Alberta. Your staff at the depots are very respectful, knowledgeable and ready to always “go that extra mile.”

Please don’t penalize us northerners by cutting away this travel option in and out of our home base, but allow Greyhound to continue this safe, pleasant and reliable service to those of us presently using it, and to future customers and patrons.

Your slogan has always been “Go Greyhound and leave the driving to us.” After almost four and a half decades of exceptional riding and freight service, I would love to continue to do so.

Victoria Manson

Lone Butte

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