Why is Orange Shirt Day important to you?

“We wear orange shirts for the First Nations kids. I’m part native and I think native kids are the best.” - Kaden Weber“We wear orange shirts for the First Nations kids. I’m part native and I think native kids are the best.” - Kaden Weber
“Orange Shirt Day is important to me because we celebrate Indigenous voices that were taken away at residential school.” - Sonny Reid.“Orange Shirt Day is important to me because we celebrate Indigenous voices that were taken away at residential school.” - Sonny Reid.
“I’m not First Nations but I know that kids who went to the residential schools had a bad time.” - Ty Williams.“I’m not First Nations but I know that kids who went to the residential schools had a bad time.” - Ty Williams.
“I’m First Nations and I’m important.” - Jayden Sweezey.“I’m First Nations and I’m important.” - Jayden Sweezey.
“When a little girl went to residential school her orange shirt was taken away from her. We should remember her and what happened to other residential school survivors.” - Alexis Walker.“When a little girl went to residential school her orange shirt was taken away from her. We should remember her and what happened to other residential school survivors.” - Alexis Walker.
”It’s important to learn about what happened to residential school survivors.” - Pawan Nijjar.”It’s important to learn about what happened to residential school survivors.” - Pawan Nijjar.

Some students at 100 Mile Elementary participated in some Orange Shirt Day activities Tuesday, ahead of the annual event held today, Sept. 30, in conjunction with the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation.

Orange Shirt Day honours the children who survived residential schools and remembers those who did not. It tells the story of Phyllis Webstad, of the Stswecem’c Xgat’tem First Nation, who arrived on her first day of residential school wearing a new orange shirt, which was then taken from her.

READ MORE: Phyllis Webstad, truth and reconciliation champion

Orange Shirt Day is now a symbol of the stripping away of culture and freedom experienced by Indigenous children over generations. The new National Day for Truth and Reconciliation also honours the lost children and survivors of residential schools, their families and communities.



patrick.davies@100milefreepress.net

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