CP Rail train derailment near Field, B.C., on February 4. TSB Photo

RCMP to review fatal B.C. train derailment investigation after evidence points to ‘cover up’

The derailment, which occurred on Feb. 4, 2019, killed three men from Calgary

The RCMP will be reviewing the investigation into the fatal CP train derailment that occurred nearly a year ago just outside of Field.

The derailment, which occurred on Feb. 4, 2019, killed three men from Calgary, including conductor Dylan Paradis, engineer Andrew Dockrell and trainee Daniel Waldenberger-Bulmer.

In total, 99 of the train’s 112 cars left the tracks as it came barrelling down the Spiral Tunnels out of control just east of Field.

The investigation by the Transportation Safety Board of Canada (TSB) found the train started to move despite the fact it had been stopped using its air brakes at Partridge, the last station prior to the entrance to the Upper Spiral Tunnel. The train was stopped for about three hours before it began to “move on its own.”

The investigation also found that no hand brakes were applied to the train, which accelerated beyond the maximum track speed set at 20 mph, causing the train to derail. A new crew had also just boarded the train and were not yet ready to depart when it began to move.

READ MORE: Train that derailed and killed three ‘just started moving on its own’

READ MORE: Runaway rail car in Field reported to Transportation Safety Board, incident happened nearly a year after fatal train derailment

The RCMP confirmed it will review the file after a seven-month long investigation by the CBC, which aired on Jan. 26, revealed evidence of a possible “cover up” by the railway company.

An interview request to CP Rail was not immediately returned.

In response to the CBC investigation, TSB released a statement on Tuesday, Jan. 28, claiming the investigation was thorough and followed procedure.

“The TSB conducts all of its investigations using a longstanding, systematic methodology and within the scope of its mandate as laid out in the Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board Act,” read the statement.

“Consequently, it was completely inappropriate for the lead TSB investigator in the Field investigation to voice any opinion implying civil and criminal liability.”

In a seperate investigation led by CP Police Services, Mark Tataryn, a former CP police officer based-in Golden, resigned from the company stating that he couldn’t be a part of an investigation that he felt was a cover-up.

Following the allegations of the possible cover-up, Teamsters Canada Rail Conference, which represents over 16,000 people in the rail industry, released a press release on Monday, Jan. 27 calling for an independent RCMP investigation.

The Alberta Federation of Labour also released a statement on Jan. 28, demanding that an independent criminal investigation into CP Rail be undertaken immediately under the Westray Act of the Canadian Criminal Code.


Claire Palmer
Editor for the Golden Star
Email me at claire.palmer@thegoldenstar.net
Follow me on Twitter

CP Rail

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

100 Mile RCMP recover stolen phone

The weekly RCMP report for the South Cariboo

UPDATE: One dead after multi-vehicle collision involving logging truck on Highway 97

DriveBC says highway expected to remain closed until 8 p.m.

District looks to complete wastewater treatment facility upgrades

The District of 100 Mile House is zeroing in on a series… Continue reading

Foxy Moonbeam makes winning debut at 100 Mile House Nordics’ Family Funday

Over 200 people came to the action-packed Family Funday event at the… Continue reading

100 Mile District seeks funding for long-overdue sidewalk on Cariboo Trail Road

‘The issue has always been sufficient funding, this is the most expensive sidewalk on the plan’

Blair says RCMP have met Wet’suwet’en conditions, calls for end to blockades

The Wet’suwet’en’s hereditary chiefs oppose the Coastal GasLink project

B.C. lawyer, professor look to piloting a mental-health court

In November, Nova Scotia’s mental-health court program marked 10 years of existence

COLUMN: Not an expert on First Nations government structures? Then maybe you should calm down

Consider your knowledge about First Nations governance structures before getting really, really mad

Meet the Wet’suwet’en who want the Coastal GasLink pipeline

Supporters of the pipeline are upset only one side is being heard nationwide

B.C. teacher gets 15-year ban after lying about having sex with just-graduated student

Teacher had been dishonest with the B.C. Commissioner for Teacher Regulation

Pipeline talks got B.C. railway open, can work again: Horgan

Premier says protest excesses damage Wet’suwet’en case

Exclusive: Pamela Anderson talks plans for waterfront Ladysmith property after 12-day marriage

Anderson says she can pay her own bills. Peters denies making comments suggesting she can’t

Burger King breaks the mould with new advertising campaign

The company is known for irreverent ad campaigns

Maggie and Tim: B.C. residential school survivor turns to faith, forgiveness in mourning son

A young man’s tragic death and his mother’s survival through hardship

Most Read