Peter Jarvis, a director with the South Cariboo Sustainability Society, at the 100 Mile House community garden. (Melissa Smalley photo - 100 Mile Free Press)

Peter Jarvis, a director with the South Cariboo Sustainability Society, at the 100 Mile House community garden. (Melissa Smalley photo - 100 Mile Free Press)

Public compost accepted at community garden

Vegetables and fruit waste from the community will now be accepted

A new composting program in 100 Mile House is being launched with the goal of reducing landfill waste and educating the public on green waste alternatives.

The South Cariboo Sustainability Society (SCSS) is now accepting vegetable and fruit waste from the public to be deposited in one of their composting bins on site at the Community Place Garden, at Birch Avenue and First Street.

“We have always composted our own stuff here,” society director Peter Jarvis explained. “Now we can put out the word that anyone can bring their kitchen waste here.”

The garden currently has a large wooden bin set up for compost collection, along with several plastic black compost receptacles and Jarvis said the group will be adding a few more in the coming weeks. Signage will also be in place with instructions as to what and where scraps can be deposited.

The group is not allowed to collect meat nor dairy products and is asking residents to not bring yard waste either, to keep the volume of compost to a manageable level.

“One of the volunteers will come two or three times a week and incorporate it into the rest of the compost,” Jarvis said.

In addition to reducing the amount of food waste going to landfills, Jarvis said the sustainability society hopes to educate residents about how easy and effective composting appropriate kitchen waste can be.

He noted that from residential areas, approximately 25 per cent of what goes into a landfill is found to be kitchen waste, something increased composting in the community can help to reduce.

“And it puts the nutrition back into the soil, which is then being used to grow things,” he noted.

The District of 100 Mile approved a request from the SCSS last month to begin accepting compost from the public at the community garden.

While some concerns were raised by district councillors in regards to the extra compost materials being an attractant to animals, Jarvis said the plot would be closely monitored by volunteers, the property owner and the district.

The group will also monitor for any concerns with smell or unsightliness that may arise from the composting program.

Jarvis noted that while there may be some adjustments needed to the program as it gets underway, he is optimistic it will benefit the community and align with regional goals to reduce solid waste heading to landfills.



melissa.smalley@100milefreepress.net

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