Privacy report says B.C. medical clinics must do more to protect information

Report makes 16 recommendations including that clinics find funding to comply with privacy policies

A privacy audit says medical clinics in British Columbia must do more to protect the sensitive personal information they collect from patients.

The province’s privacy commission looked at 22 medical clinics and found gaps in privacy management, failures to ensure that privacy practices keep up with new technology, and inadequate funds and resources to address privacy issues.

The report makes 16 recommendations including that the clinics find funding to comply with privacy policies and appointing designated privacy officers.

Information and privacy commissioner Michael McEvoy says medical clinics collect sensitive personal information and the report finds many must improve their protection practices.

He says doctors and staff at clinics are legally obligated to abide by privacy legislation, but must also ensure strong privacy programs for their patients.

ALSO READ: Doctor growth in Canada more than doubles population increase over last 5 years

“Medical clinics were chosen for this review for two reasons: the amount and sensitivity of the personal information they collect – some of the most sensitive personal information out there — and the volume of complaints and privacy breach reports my office receives that are related to privacy practices at facilities like these,” McEvoy said in a news release on Wednesday.

“There is no question about the intense demands medical professionals face; however, respecting and protecting patients’ private information is critically important.”

The Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner is an independent agency that monitors and enforces the province’s access and privacy laws.

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

CRD gives final approval for three new wheelchair-accessible trails

The CRD secured $100,000 through a rural dividend grant and matched an additional $30,000

WildSafeBC hires new co-ordinator for Cariboo region

Mareike Moore said the main message is keeping wildlife wild, communities safe

Are you sending your children back to school?

The weekly web poll for the 100 Mile Free Press

Parkside Art Gallery reopens to the public on June 2

Claudia Rings raises $2,500 from mask sales for Parkside Art Gallery

B.C. records four new COVID-19 cases, Abbotsford hospital outbreak cleared

Four senior home outbreaks also declared over, eight still active

RCMP, coroner investigate murder-suicide on Salt Spring Island

Two dead, police say there is no risk to the public

About 30% of B.C. students return to schools as in-class teaching restarts amid pandemic

Education minister noted that in-class instruction remains optional

Trudeau avoids questions about anti-racism protesters dispersed for Trump photo-op

Prime minister says racism is an issue Canadians must tackle at home, too

B.C.’s Law Enforcement Torch Run for Special Olympics goes virtual

The annual event partnering RCMP with Special Olympians is dramatically altered by COVID-19

Bateman program encourages people to sketch outside, connect with nature

#MyNatureSketch initiative encourages Canadians to become ‘bright-eyed three year olds’

Be cautious expanding COVID-19 bubble, Dr. Bonnie Henry tells B.C.

Senior homes stay off-limits as schools, businesses reopen

How to safely drink water in areas impacted by flooding

Quality and safety of drinking water can be affected during and after floods

Most Read