Goals for the hill are expansive and the new ownership group at Mount Timothy is excited for what the future holds. Angie Mindus photo.

Goals for the hill are expansive and the new ownership group at Mount Timothy is excited for what the future holds. Angie Mindus photo.

New ownership group presents Mount Timothy Resort plans

‘More activity and more people on the hill means more fun’

As the guest speaker at the South Cariboo Chamber of Commerce’s (SCCC) annual general meeting on May 8, Walter Bramsleven presented board members with plenty to be excited about.

Bramsleven presented to the SCCC in the Valley Room behind the Red Coach Inn on Wednesday evening. A resident since 1988, he has always been involved with his community, whether by playing slow-pitch or coaching young hockey players in 100 Mile House.

Locals might recognize him from years of involvement with Sitka Log Homes, but may not realize that Bramsleven is also the new general manager of the Mount Timothy Recreation Resort, which was purchased by KevLar Development Group in December 2018.

As part of the transfer agreement, KevLar agreed to pay all outstanding debts owed by Mount Timothy Ski Society (MTSS), a promise they have kept.

At Wednesday’s AGM, Bramsleven announced the group’s plans for the future of Mount Timothy, which is rebranding itself from a ski hill to a recreation resort. Bramsleven is one of three in the new ownership group and told SCCC members that he and his partners are grateful to everyone who worked on the hill before its sale. The primary owners are Larry Henderson of Lac la Hache and Kevin McCray of Prince George.

Previous contributions will not be forgotten, said Bramsleven, who offered nothing but admiration to previous owners involved, admitting that the resort has encountered “a succession of bad luck” in the past.

Read more: SOLD: Mt. Timothy Ski Hill purchased by private investors.

KevLar Development Group has been working with the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure to ensure the road to the ski hill remains well managed.

He also addressed any potential concerns of heavy snowfall, promising that whatever Interior Roads can’t manage will be maintained by hill owners themselves via private snow plow.

The main log lodge at Mount Timothy is still undergoing renovations, but its owners have already obtained a liquor licence. The lodge kitchen has been partially rebuilt to include new appliances.

Upon completion, the lodge will offer a full-service restaurant catering to local favourites—like poutine— while also servicing a demand for upscale dining. The group compared menus of successful B.C. ski hills to establish their own offerings.

Another important area of research for Mount Timothy’s new ownership group involved understanding what happens at ski resorts after guests finish hill activities for the day. Bramsleven told board members that the best way to make money at a ski hill is by capitalizing on what occurs between the hours of 3 and 9 p.m. He referenced successful resorts like Whistler and Sun Peaks (Kamloops), where countless activities are offered to guests beyond skiing and snowboarding.

“We want to be an all-season resort,” said Bramsleven. “More activity and more people on the hill means more fun.”

Mount Timothy won’t operate this summer but hopes to be open for the summer in 2020, and of course, for winter this year. They also plan to install campsites in response to a growing public demand for accommodations on the hill.

“Snowmobilers spend money,” Bramsleven advised, promising that Mount Timothy will offer plenty of access to trails and even to potential repair services. The owners hope to cater to mountain bikers in the future, too, but foot traffic from bikers significantly slows down chair traffic, which means the hill will likely offer shuttle bus services to transport mountain bikers instead.

They’re not just offering recreational activities at Mount Timothy, either. Bramsleven wants residents to experience special events like weddings on the hill, if they please, as well as family reunions and perhaps one day, even outdoor concerts. Goals for the hill are expansive and the team is clearly excited for what the future holds.

Before all that can happen, though, Bramsleven and his partners are still working to complete the changes they’ve made to the resort, which include sewer and landscaping projects.

The hill’s Red Chair will receive non-destructive testing after the May Long Weekend, to ensure that all chairs and ropes are safe for the public. Bramsleven assured listeners that this is standard procedure.

He and his partners are determined to restore the public’s faith in the hill: “Yes, we’re a private enterprise, and we’re going to have this thing up safe and secure.”

Read more: IT’S OFFICIAL: Mt. Timothy sale complete.

The resort has already secured some key staffing positions, as they’re determined to become operational year-round. That could mean Mount Timothy will be open for roughly ten months at most, barring winter conditions.

The hill will continue to service both the communities of 100 Mile House and Williams Lake and promises that one thing has not changed—their pricing.

The group intends to walk before they run, with plans to focus on rebuilding the mountain’s client base and instilling trust within the community once more.

Bramsleven thinks that Mount Timothy can foster similar success to resorts like Harper Mountain by including a tube park of its own. The installation could mean an earlier season opening.

The new owners are in the process of rebranding Mount Timothy, so locals can still find the resort on Facebook under the name Mt. Timothy Ski Area. For lift passes and more resort information, visit www.skitimothy.com.


raven.nyman@100milefreepress.net

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

A 17-year-old snowmobiler used his backcountry survival sense in preparation to spend the night on the mountain near 100 Mile House Saturday, Jan. 16, 2021 after getting lost. (South Cariboo Search and Rescue Facebook photo)
Teen praised for backcountry survival skills after getting lost in South Cariboo mountains

“This young man did everything right after things went wrong.”

Interior Health update. File photo.
86 new COVID-19 cases, two more deaths in Interior Health

The new deaths are from Heritage Square, a long-term care facility in Vernon

Jethro Rolland, 8, and Guinevere Rolland, 6, test out the ice at the new outdoor rink in 100 Mile House. (Kelly Sinoski photo - 100 Mile Free Press).
Outdoor ice rinks popular Cariboo pastime

The skaters are out this winter across the South Cariboo.

A power outage Thursday night left nearly 3,000 homes in Clinton and the 70 Mile areas in the dark. (Katie McCullough photo).
Updated: Clinton, 70 Mile left in the dark after vehicle crashes into transmission pole

BC Hydro still working to restore power to 330 homes in 70 Mile House

A scene from “Canada and the Gulf War: In their own words,” a video by The Memory Project, a program of Historica Canada, is shown in this undated illustration. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO - Historica Canada
New video marks Canada’s contributions to first Gulf War on 30th anniversary

Veterans Affairs Canada says around 4,500 Canadian military personnel served during the war

Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole holds a press conference on Parliament Hill, in Ottawa on December 10, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
No place for ‘far right’ in Conservative Party, Erin O’Toole says

O’Toole condemned the Capitol attack as ‘horrifying’ and sought to distance himself and the Tories from Trumpism

A passer by walks in High Park, in Toronto, Thursday, Jan. 14, 2021. This workweek will kick off with what’s fabled to be the most depressing day of the year, during one of the darkest eras in recent history. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young
‘Blue Monday’ getting you down? Exercise may be the cure, say experts

Many jurisdictions are tightening restrictions to curb soaring COVID-19 case counts

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

A health-care worker prepares a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at a UHN COVID-19 vaccine clinic in Toronto on Thursday, January 7, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
COVID-19: Provinces work on revised plans as Pfizer-BioNTech shipments to slow down

Anita Anand said she understands and shares Canadians’ concerns about the drug company’s decision

Tourists take photographs outside the British Columbia Legislature in Victoria, B.C., on Friday August 26, 2011. A coalition of British Columbia tourism industry groups is urging the provincial government to not pursue plans to ban domestic travel to fight the spread of COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
B.C. travel ban will harm struggling tourism sector, says industry coalition

B.C. government would have to show evidence a travel ban is necessary

(Phil McLachlan - Capital News)
‘Targeted’ shooting in Coquitlam leaves woman in hospital

The woman suffered non-life threatening injuries in what police believe to be a targeted shooting Saturday morning

JaHyung Lee, “Canada’s oldest senior” at 110 years old, received his first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine on Thursday, Jan. 14, 2021. He lives at Amenida Seniors Community in Newton. (Submitted photo: Amenida Seniors Community)
A unique-looking deer has been visiting a Nanoose Bay property with its mother. (Frieda Van der Ree photo)
A deer with 3 ears? Unique animal routinely visits B.C. property

Experts say interesting look may be result of an injury rather than an odd birth defect

Most Read