Kieris O’Neill is scared that by the end of May she and her dog will not have a place to call home, because there is nothing available to rent in Maple Ridge. (Neil Corbett/THE NEWS)

Kieris O’Neill is scared that by the end of May she and her dog will not have a place to call home, because there is nothing available to rent in Maple Ridge. (Neil Corbett/THE NEWS)

Near-zero vacancy rate has disabled B.C. senior facing homelessness

79-year-old in a wheelchair will appeal to Maple Ridge council

Kieris O’Neill is staring homelessness in the face.

As governments try and address a near-zero vacancy rate and property prices that are seeing rental costs soar, the Maple Ridge disabled senior simply cannot find a new place to live, even though she can afford to pay $1,200 to $1,300 per month.

“I have leads, but I have been tracking for two and a half months… and it is just absolutely horrendous out there,” she said. “I’ve been in a fit for weeks.”

It’s ironic, because she used to help seniors find places to live. O’Neill was a volunteer for Ridge Meadows Community Services with the Seniors Connect program, which is about seniors helping seniors.

O’Neill received notice on March 9 that her landlord would be closing his 230th Street basement suite. It needs extensive renovations to be considered a legal suite by city hall, she told her tenant, including fire barriers, fans and the fact that it is larger than the city permits secondary suites to be. She has to be out by the end of May.

With no place to go, O’Neill is going to ask council to allow a tenants’ amnesty – basically saying city hall won’t enforce its secondary suites bylaws until tenants have someplace to go.

“The city turns a blind eye to senior rentals and low income people,” she said. “There never has been enough (apartments), but it has gotten far too low.”

“I always have difficulty finding a place to live because I am in a wheelchair and wheelchair accessible accommodation is hard to find,” she said. “In 2016 I was turned down nine times because of my chair. How do I know? because I asked prospective landlords what the problem was.”

Finding housing is hard for everyone.

The Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation reported in October 2017 the vacancy rate in Maple Ridge was 0.6 per cent. It reported the vacancy rate for the entire Metro area was less than one per cent, and the average rent was up 5.9 per cent to almost $1,300. CMHC reported that the high cost of home ownership in the region is putting strong upward pressure on rents.

O’Neill has lived in Maple Ridge for 50 years, early in her career working as a labratory technician at Ridge Meadows Hospital. She went back to university for more education, then worked as a researched at St. Paul’s and Vancouver General Hospitals. She ended her working life working in partnership with her husband in real estate.

“I really don’t want to leave. I will if I have to,” she said.

She has been looking everywhere, including Vancouver Housing, B.C. Building Coop , Legion and Lee towers and many different apartment complexes, and private basement suites.”

She acknowledges that the province is trying to catch up with the problem, with proposed new affordable rental housing at 21375 Lougheed Highway – new homes for low-income families and seniors.

Community Services also has a complex of 94-units of affordable rental housing in the works on 228th Street. Construction could start this summer.

“If you turn the first shovel tomorrow we won’t be in it for two years,” she lamented.

She is still looking, but is approachign a dire situation.

“There is absolutely nothing I can afford on my pension, and so on the 31st of May, unless my luck changes, I will be homeless,” she said. “Not something I would expect to happen to a 79-year-old disabled person in a wheelchair.”

O’Neill said she has reached out to some friends, and may be able to impose on their hospitality for a week at a time. If not, she isn’t sure what to do.

“I really wish I knew.

“I know one thing – I’m scared stiff.”

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Interior Health reported 91 new COVID-19 cases in the region Jan. 20, 2021 and three additional deaths. (Jennifer Smith - Morning Star)
95 new COVID-19 cases in Interior Health, two deaths

Another member of Vernon’s Noric House has passed

A specialized RCMP team is investigating a suspicious trailer, which might have connections to the illicit drug trade, found abandoned outside a Cache Creek motel. (Photo credit: <em>Journal</em> files)
RCMP investigating suspicious trailer found abandoned in Cache Creek

Hazardous materials believed to be consistent with the production of illicit drugs were found

Grade 5 student Liam Ouellette and Grade 4 student Trigg Jansen read together in Horse Lake Elementary School’s reading room. (Patrick Davies photo - 100 Mile Free Press)
Reading, literacy opens doors to learning

Students at Horse Lake Elementary School seek out challenging reads.

100 Mile Mayor Mitch Campsall. (Kelly Sinoski photo, 100 Mile Free Press).
100 Mile Mayor Mitch Campsall. (Kelly Sinoski photo, 100 Mile Free Press).
100 Mile mayor calls on residents to ‘work together’ during pandemic

Mitch Campsall also urges residents to follow the health orders.

Interior Health has declared the Cariboo Chilcotin a community cluster. (Angie Mindus photo)
Interior Health declares Cariboo Chilcotin region a COVID-19 cluster, 215 cases since Jan. 1

Most cases are related to transmission at social events and gatherings in Williams Lake

Businesses continue to struggle under COVID-19 restrictions as the pandemic reaches the one-year mark. (B.C. government)
Another 564 COVID-19 cases, mass vaccine plan coming Friday

15 more deaths, community cluster declared in Williams Lake

Premier John Horgan leaves the podium following his first press conference of the year as he comments on various questions from the media in the Press Gallery at B.C. Legislature in Victoria, B.C., on Monday, January 13, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
Interprovincial travel restrictions a no-go, Horgan says after reviewing legal options

The B.C. NDP government sought legal advice as concerns of travel continue

Gem Lake Top, at Big White Ski Resort, seen at Jan. 8. (Big White Ski Resort)
Big White cancels $7.3M in lift tickets, accommodations due to COVID-19 orders

Since November, the ski resort has been forced to make several changes

Darlene Curylo scratched a $3M ticket, BCLC’s largest ever scratch and win prize. (BCLC)
Kelowna woman in shock after winning BCLC’s largest-ever instant-ticket prize

Darlene Curylo couldn’t believe her eyes when she saw the amount of money she’d won from a scratch ticket

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

While each person has different reasons for becoming homeless, a UBCO study shows they learn through their interactions with different services to perform ‘as homeless’ based on the expectations of service providers. (Contributed)
Kelowna homeless forced to ‘perform’ for resources, says UBCO study

One participant in the study said ‘It is about looking homeless, but not too homeless’

Gov. Gen. Julie Payette takes the royal salute from the Guard of Honour as she makes her way deliver the the throne speech, Wednesday, September 23, 2020 in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Fred Chartrand
Gov. Gen. Julie Payette resigns, apologizes for ‘tensions’ at Rideau Hall

Payette, who is the Queen’s representative in Canada, has been the governor general since 2017

Grounded WestJet Boeing 737 Max aircraft are shown at the airline’s facilities in Calgary, Alta., Tuesday, May 7, 2019. WestJet will operate the first commercial Boeing 737 Max flight in Canada today since the aircraft was grounded in 2019 following two deadly crashes. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Passengers unfazed as WestJet returns Boeing 737 Max to service on Vancouver flight

After a lengthy review process, Transport Canada cleared the plane to return to Canadian airspace

The top part of the fossil burrow, seen from the side, with feathery lines from the disturbance of the soil – thought to be caused by the worm pulling prey into the burrow. (Paleoenvironntal Sediment Laboratory/National Taiwan University)
PHOTOS: SFU researchers find evidence of ‘giant’ predatory worms on ocean floor

Fossils found the prove the existence of an ancient Taiwanese worm as long as two metres

Most Read