ICBC encourages smart driving for holiday weekend

Easter long weekend approaching

Even though winter is now over, road conditions can still be challenging at this time of the year.

With unpredictable weather and increased traffic on our roads over the approaching long weekend, ICBC is asking drivers to drive smart and avoid distractions behind the wheel.

Every Easter long weekend, an average of four people are killed and 650 injured in 2,300 crashes in B.C. (Numbers are based on ICBC data 2011 to 2015. Fatality data based on police data 2011 to 2015. Easter long weekend is calculated from 6 p.m. the Thursday prior to Good Friday until midnight Easter Monday).

Regional statistics

On average, 490 people are injured in 1,500 crashes every year in the Lower Mainland over the Easter long weekend;

On average, 62 people are injured in 310 crashes every year in the Southern Interior;.

On average, 78 people are injured in 310 crashes every year on Vancouver Island;

On average, 20 people are injured in 130 crashes every year in the North Central region.

ICBC’s drive smart tips for Easter weekend:

Check your vehicle: If this is your first longer drive of the year, remember to check your engine oil, washer fluid, lights and inspect your vehicle tires, including the spare, to make sure they are in good condition and properly inflated.

Be prepared: Plan your route and visit drivebc.ca to check road and weather conditions before starting your trip. Be realistic about travel times over the long weekend and expect delays. Pack an emergency kit in your vehicle in case you get stuck or stranded.

Get some rest: Make sure you’re well rested before heading out on a long drive. Take breaks or switch drivers every two hours to avoid fatigue.

Slow down on wet roads: Allow yourself at least twice the normal braking distance on wet or slippery roads. Avoid driving through flooded or washed out roads.

Avoid distractions: Spring brings more cyclists, pedestrians and motorcyclists on our roads. Avoid distractions behind the wheel so you are alert and see all road users. Make important calls and send texts on your cell phone before you start your trip.

Watch for signs of wildlife: Animals may be feeding on plants near the roadside this spring. Slow down and use caution when you see wildlife on or near a highway, so you have time to react if an animal crosses your path.

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