Grazing seminar targets invasive plants

The Cariboo Chilcotin Coast Invasive Plant Committee (CCCIPC) chair Emily Sonntag says invasive plants and noxious weeds are a growing problem.

The Cariboo Chilcotin Coast Invasive Plant Committee (CCCIPC) chair Emily Sonntag says invasive plants and noxious weeds are a growing problem.

“It’s a global issue that affects us on a local level. Invasive plants are taking over our native plants, insects and wildlife, and threatening our water sources and fish habitat.”

There are several ways to control invasive plants on a site- and species-specific basis, including the application of herbicides, hand pulling, cutting, bio-controls (insects), cultural (encouraging healthy ecosystems) and targeted grazing methods, she explains.

A free Targeted Grazing Seminar for landowners and managers with livestock is being held by CCCIPC on Aug. 16 in Williams Lake. Dr. Kathy Voth will be instructing folks how to train animals to target graze invasive plants.

Space may be limited, so call ahead to pre-register.  A registration form can be completed online at www.cccipc.ca, or call the CCCIPC office at 250-392-1400.

According to the World Conservation Union, Sonntag says invasive alien species are the second most significant threat to biodiversity, after habitat loss.

The Environment Canada website at www.ec.gc.ca/eee-ias also states the severe and often irreversible impact of invasive alien species can cost billions of dollars each year.