Defence lawyer Boris Bytensky, left to right, Justice Ruby Wong, Alek Minassian and Crown prosecutor Joe Callaghan are shown in court as Minassian appears by video in Toronto on Thursday, May 10, 2018 in this courtroom sketch. Three new charges of attempted murder were laid Thursday against the man accused in a deadly van attack that took place in north Toronto last month. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Alexandra Newbould

Family of man accused of Toronto van attack devastated and grieving for victims

Police have said eight women and two men died after Alek Minassian, 25, of Richmond Hill, Ont., allegedly drove a rental van down a busy sidewalk on April 23.

The family of the man accused in the deadly van attack that shocked Toronto last month is grieving for the victims but stands by the accused, the man’s lawyer said Thursday as three new charges were laid against his client.

Alek Minassian, 25, of Richmond Hill, Ont., now faces 10 counts of first-degree murder and 16 counts of attempted murder in the April 23 incident.

Related: Three new attempted murder charges for man accused in Toronto van attack

Eight women and two men died after a rental van mounted a sidewalk along a busy street in north Toronto and ran down pedestrians in its path. Authorities initially said 13 people were injured that day but further investigation revealed three others were also hurt.

Following a brief hearing where three new attempted murder charges were laid against Minassian, his lawyer said outside court that his client’s family was devastated.

“They appreciate the devastation on many other families as well,” Boris Bytensky said. “They’re going to allow everyone to grieve. They send their condolences and really their prayers for everyone affected by this.

“They stand behind their son and are very respectful of the court process,” Bytensky said, adding that he didn’t want to talk about how his client was doing.

“This isn’t a time to discuss Mr. Minassian, this is still a grieving period for the city,” he said. “There are many families that are grieving for those lives lost and those injured.”

Minassian appeared in court by video from jail, standing straight with his arms at his side, and didn’t say a word. Several people in court cried during the brief hearing, which concluded with the case being put over to Sept. 14.

Bytensky said the adjournment in the case is a little longer than usual because the Crown has a lot of disclosure to go through before handing it over to the defence. He added that he had no intention of litigating the case through the media.

Insp. Bryan Bott, the head of Toronto’s homicide squad, said shortly after the attack that police hadn’t identified a motive, but that the evidence they had didn’t meet the threshold for terrorism charges.

Bytensky said there’s no evidence thus far that suggests the attack was an act of terrorism.

“There’s a lot of people who were terrified,” he said. “This was obviously a very terrifying incident, but there’s no terrorism as we usually use that term involved in this case.”

Those who died in last month’s attack ranged in age from 22 to 94, and included a student from South Korea and a man from Jordan.

Related: Toronto van attack accused was briefly in Canadian Armed Forces

Eight people injured in the attack remain either in hospital or a rehabilitative facility, Bott said Thursday.

Saron Gebressellassi, a lawyer helping out many of those injured, was at Minassian’s court appearance.

“The families want to know what’s going on here,” Gebressellassi said. “But their priorities are elsewhere, so I’m going to let them know.”

She went to Sunnbyrook Hospital on the day of the attack to help the victims, and said questions from them and their families go far beyond medical concerns.

“I would be getting so many questions from people about how to pay the mortgage, how do we pay the rent,” she said. ”That’s what people don’t see — come the first of the month, the rent is due.”

Gebressellassi said she’s gotten close to Amaresh Tesfamariam, an Eritrean-Canadian who has no immediate family in Toronto but whose family is travelling in and out of the United States to be by her bedside.

“She’s still in the ICU,” Gebressellassi said. “The family is praying for the best. It’s very, very serious.”

Liam Casey, The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Did you exercise your civic duty by voting for mayor and council of 100 Mile House?

Did you exercise your civic duty by voting for mayor and council… Continue reading

Incumbents and acclaimed mayors win elections all across B.C.’s north

Fraser Lake saw their first female mayor elected

Mayoral results from across B.C.

Voters in 162 municipalities in B.C. set to elect mayor, council, school board and more

Every vote counts: 10 tightest races in B.C.’s municipal elections

Peachland saw their election decided by just one vote

Highway 97 reopens following MVI at Clinton

Highway 97 is now reopened at Clinton

Canada Post strikes leaves small shops in the lurch as holidays approach: CFIB

Rotating strikes began in Victoria, Edmonton, Halifax and Windsor

CFL playoff picture still muddled heading into weekend action

League revealed last week no fewer than 64 potential playoff permutations

New monitoring of vessel noise impact on endangered whales announced

Federal government to monitor underwater ship and mammal noise in B.C.’s Salish Sea

Used election signs could serve as emergency shelters, B.C. candidate says

Langley Township council hopeful wants to build one-person foul weather shelters for homeless

Interior Health urges public to get a flu shot

Health authority says it will help to stop the spread of influenza

‘Violent’ Prince George man wanted on Canada-wide warrant

RCMP say the man has likely made his way to the Lower Mainland or another community

Liberals write off $6.3 billion in loans as part of money never to be collected

That includes student loans and a $2.6 billion write off that came through Export Development Canada

Trudeau, McKenna to announce compensation for federal carbon plan

Provinces that don’t have a carbon price of at least $20 per tonne of emissions will have Ottawa’s plan forced on them

Most Read