Redford Temple, of Central Interior Concrete Services, uses a saw to cut wet concrete on Dogwood Avenue as the company instals a new curb. (Patrick Davies photo - 100 Mile Free Press)

Redford Temple, of Central Interior Concrete Services, uses a saw to cut wet concrete on Dogwood Avenue as the company instals a new curb. (Patrick Davies photo - 100 Mile Free Press)

Disabled resident concerned about sidewalk project

Marney Ryan wants more communication from district

Marny Ryan is taking issue with the District of 100 Mile House and its ongoing sidewalk project outside her home on Dogwood Avenue.

The 100 Mile resident, whose mobility was severely limited following a car crash several years ago, said the project, which has been ongoing for two years, has made it difficult for her to get in and out of her home. Having to walk through a trench and park further away is inconvenient and mentally and physically exhausting, she said.

“Communication is really important and so is not assuming that everyone is going to be able to jump over a two-foot wire and go through a trench,” Ryan said. “I’m not capable of jumping over that. Not everyone has a sign on their head saying ‘I have a disability.’”

Her frustration has been fuelled by what she said is a lack of clear communication from the District of 100 Mile House and Bree Contracting. Earlier this month she said she was asked to leave her home with 20 minutes to spare so paving could be done.

Todd Conway, the district’s director of community services, said the District’s policy when conducting public works is to communicate with the public via a notice on the District’s website, sending a letter to each address and door-to-door knocking to ensure everyone is equally informed. He added in addition to the new curb and sidewalk, the project will include an upgrade to Dogwood’s local sewer system.

The work on Dogwood Avenue will be finished by the end of the summer.

Other projects underway

The work is one of three major projects in the District, which is also doing a major upgrade to the water main and a cleanup of 100 Mile House’s wastewater treatment facility.

For the water main, Conway said work crews have already begun to install the new line between Birch Avenue and Fifth Street all the way to Cedar Avenue and before it ultimately runs up to Horse Lake Road. Once completed, he said, it will provide the district with a secondary route to fill the town’s water towers and add a new layer of redundancy to the system.

Conway said it’s unlikely any residents will be disrupted by the wastewater project. Workers will clean 100 Mile’s sewage lagoons of sludge and add a larger emergency overflow at their main lift station near the soccer fields.

“There will be a holding bin there in case anything was to go wrong and then it also includes some upgrades to some pumps,” Conway said. “The biggest scope of the project will be cleaning the sewage lagoons and adding new aeration and air pumps.”

The water main upgrade and wastewater project will cost “just shy of $3 million” Conway said. All of these projects, he said, will improve the lives of 100 Mile residents and should be completed by the end of the summer.



patrick.davies@100milefreepress.net

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