A Boeing 737 MAX jet, piloted by Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) chief Steve Dickson, prepares to land at Boeing Field following a test flight in Seattle. Boeing Co. reported more cancellations for its 737 MAX jet, which this week is scheduled to carry paying passengers for the first time since the planes were grounded 21 months ago after two deadly crashes. The company said Tuesday, Dec. 8, 2020, that orders for 88 of the planes were canceled in November. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)

A Boeing 737 MAX jet, piloted by Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) chief Steve Dickson, prepares to land at Boeing Field following a test flight in Seattle. Boeing Co. reported more cancellations for its 737 MAX jet, which this week is scheduled to carry paying passengers for the first time since the planes were grounded 21 months ago after two deadly crashes. The company said Tuesday, Dec. 8, 2020, that orders for 88 of the planes were canceled in November. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)

Canada gives OK to Boeing 737 Max changes but planes still grounded

Transport Canada says the change will help reduce pilot workload

The problem-plagued Boeing 737 Max aircraft are a step closer to flying again in Canada.

The government has approved changes to the planes, among them enabling pilots to disable a faulty warning system.

Transport Canada says the change will help reduce pilot workload.

The planes were grounded worldwide in January after two crashes, one of which killed 18 Canadians in Ethiopia.

Transport Canada has been reviewing the proposed modifications, already approved in the U.S.

The agency says safety plans and other changes are still needed before the planes can fly again.

The Canadian Press

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