In this photo taken on March 25, 2020, streets of downtown Victoria were quieter than usual in the wake of physical isolation mandates from the provincial and federal governments. (Arnold Lim / Black Press)

Businesses hard-hit by COVID-19 to get 75% in rent cost relief: Trudeau

Government to cover 50 per cent, with expectation that 25 per cent be absorbed by property owners

The federal government has announced rent relief for small- and medium-sized businesses hard-hit by COVID-19, with 50 per cent supplemented by governments and an expectation that property owners absorb the other 25 per cent.

Wearing a red tie in honour of the victims in the recent Nova Scotia shooting rampage, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau revealed details about the Canada Emergency Commercial Rent Assistance program on Friday (April 24) outside of Rideau Cottage in Ottawa.

“If you had to close up shop because of public health recommendations, if you don’t have a lot of money coming in because people aren’t spending much these days, you may be worried about keeping your office space,” Trudeau said.

The rental assistance was first announced on April 16, but the federal government needed to convene with individual provincial leaders, who have jurisdiction over rental rules.

“The government will cover 50 per cent of the reduction, with the property owner covering the rest,” Trudeau said.

To be eligible, small and medium-sized businesses must have a monthly rent cost of less than $50,000 and be experiencing at least a 70-per-cent decrease in revenue due to the pandemic.

Non-profits and non-government organizations are also eligible. Rent support will be retroactive for April, and be available for May and June.

The program will operate through a rent forgiveness agreement between the business owner and mortgaged property owner. The agreement must stipulate that the property owner will reduce rent by at least 75 per cent over the three months, as well as pledge not to evict the tenant while the agreement is in place.

Trudeau said business owners who cannot afford the remaining 25 per cent in rental costs can apply for the one-time business loan announced in March, which allows for eligible businesses to borrow $40,000 with one-quarter forgiveness.

Trudeau pledged that options for larger businesses will also be made available in coming weeks.

This week, Saskatchewan announced it would be reopening some businesses on May 4, as part of a five-phase plan.

Starting May 4, dentist offices, optometry clinics and physical therapy providers can open, while some retail stores might be allowed to operate as of May 19.

The rental assistance comes as newly released data from the federal government shows that there have been more than seven million unique applications for the Canada Emergency Response Benefit – the federal emergency aid program which gives eligible workers $2,000 a month in funds amid the pandemic.

That means that $22.4 billion has been paid out through the program, which has a budget of $24 billion.

Trudeau is scheduled to hold a conference call with provincial and territorial premiers this afternoon, at which he is expected to raise another issue that is under provincial jurisdiction — the tragedy unfolding at under-staffed long-term care homes where more than half of Canada’s deaths from COVID-19 have occurred.

– with a file from The Canadian Press


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

CoronavirusJustin Trudeau

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Bears are back and they’re not social distancing from humans

As you’re out working in your yard, take care of some items that might attract hungry bears

Funding available for South Cariboo charities

Funding is part of the Government of Canada’s $350 million Emergency Support Fund

High tech fish transport system set up to ‘whoosh’ salmon past Big Bar landslide

Fish will spend about 20 seconds inside the system, moving at roughly 20 metres per second

B.C. legislature coming back June 22 as COVID-19 emergency hits record

Pandemic restrictions now longer than 2017 wildfire emergency

B.C.’s essential grocery, hardware store employees should get pandemic pay: retail group

Only B.C.’s social, health and corrections workers are eligible for top-ups

Edmonton, Vancouver and Toronto vying to be NHL hubs, but there’s a catch

The NHL unveiled a return-to-play plan that would feature 24 teams

B.C. sees 9 new COVID-19 cases, one death as officials watch for new cases amid Phase Two

Number of confirmed active cases is at 244, with 37 people in hospital

Nanaimo senior clocked going 50 km/hr over limit says her SUV shouldn’t be impounded

RCMP say they can’t exercise discretion when it comes to excessive speeding tickets

Illicit-drug deaths up in B.C. and remain highest in Canada: chief coroner

More than 4,700 people have died of overdoses since B.C. declared a public health emergency in early 2016

CMHC sees declines in home prices, sales, starts that will linger to end of 2022

CMHC said average housing prices could fall anywhere from nine to 18 per cent in its forecast

B.C. Paralympian named to Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame

Three-time world and Paralympic gold medalist Sonja Gaudet is part of 11-member class

Risk of COVID-19 low in schools, Interior Health states

Medical Health Officer reassures parents as some children and staff head back to class June 1

Most Read