BC Ferries said it’s taking extra measures to clean ferries due to the coronavirus. (Black Press Media file photo)

BC Ferries takes extra measures to clean vessels following Vancouver coronavirus case

Health experts say chances of contracting the disease in Canada are still low

Every day thousands of people travel between the mainland and Vancouver Island via the Tsawwassen-Swartz Bay and Horseshoe Bay-Departure Bay BC Ferries routes, making the vessels potential sites for spreading germs.

This has prompted BC Ferries to step up its typical protocols in the wake of one case of coronavirus being diagnosed in the Vancouver area.

On Thursday, the World Health Organization declared the novel coronavirus as a global health emergency, after more than 8,000 cases have been diagnosed with more than 170 deaths, a majority of which are in China. By Friday morning almost 10,000 cases had been diagnosed globally. Three cases have been confirmed in Canada.

ALSO READ: Greater Victoria pharmacies sell out of masks, hand sanitizer in wake of coronavirus

“BC Ferries is regularly monitoring information and direction from the BC Centre for Disease Control and the Public Health Agency of Canada regarding the Coronavirus. The risk associated with the spread of the Coronavirus in British Columbia and Canada has been deemed to be low. We will continue to closely monitor the situation,” said Astrid Braunschmidt, manager of corporate communications at BC Ferries, in an emailed statement.

“We have standard procedures in place to mitigate the spread of illness on our ferries and at our terminals. As a precaution, crews at our terminals and on board our vessels are taking extra measures to clean all touch points.”

ALSO READ: B.C. reports first coronavirus in Vancouver region

The BC Centre for Disease Control says symptoms can present themselves differently, depending on an individual’s immune system, but could include a runny nose, headache, sore throat, fever, feeling unwell, difficulty breathing, pneumonia, kidney failure and death.

Health experts say that the best preventative measures are the same as those applied to a typical flu; washing hands, coughing or sneezing into elbows and arms versus hands, not sharing food, and avoiding interactions with people who are ill.

vnc.editorial@blackpress.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter
and Instagram

BCFerriesCoronavirus

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

CRD gives final approval for three new wheelchair-accessible trails

The CRD secured $100,000 through a rural dividend grant and matched an additional $30,000

WildSafeBC hires new co-ordinator for Cariboo region

Mareike Moore said the main message is keeping wildlife wild, communities safe

Are you sending your children back to school?

The weekly web poll for the 100 Mile Free Press

Parkside Art Gallery reopens to the public on June 2

Claudia Rings raises $2,500 from mask sales for Parkside Art Gallery

Boat stolen, funds extorted from elderly neighbour

The weekly police report for the South Cariboo area

VIDEO: A Vancouver Island black bear takes weekend nap in eagle tree

Videos captured by Terry Eissfeldt shows the bear arriving Saturday night and sleeping in on Sunday

About 30% of B.C. students return to schools as in-class teaching restarts amid pandemic

Education minister noted that in-class instruction remains optional

RCMP, coroner investigate ‘unexpected deaths’ on Salt Spring Island

Two dead, police say there is no risk to the public

Trudeau avoids questions about anti-racism protesters dispersed for Trump photo-op

Prime minister says racism is an issue Canadians must tackle at home, too

How to safely drink water in areas impacted by flooding

Quality and safety of drinking water can be affected during and after floods

NDP getting COVID-19 wage subsidy ‘indirectly,’ B.C. Liberal leader says

B.C. NDP says Andrew Wilkinson is wrong about federal link

Parent, superintendent, trustee report smooth return to classrooms in B.C.

The biggest challenge is convincing families that it’s safe, some say

Most Read