Attorney General David Eby (Black Press Media files)

B.C. government details regulations, changes in ICBC overhaul

Pre-approved services, accident benefit caps and how ICBC defines injuries part of update

The provincial government has made numerous cost-saving measures at ICBC official, including changes to accident benefits and how the auto insurance crown corporation categorizes different injuries.

The various regulations will go into effect April 1, 2019, according to documents signed by Attorney General David Eby Friday.

“These changes to ICBC’s accident benefits will cost an estimated $200 million annually,” a news release from the province reads. “This will be offset by an estimated saving of $1.2 billion per year through reduced legal costs, a limit on payouts for pain and suffering for minor injuries and a new dispute resolution model.”

Changes include a new limit of $5,500 for pain and suffering in minor injury claims, adding new pre-approved types of treatment such as kinesiology and counselling and classifying concussions as minor injuries.

READ MORE: ICBC overhaul includes new $50 fee for lending out your car to friends, family

READ MORE: ICBC doubles compensation for crash victims with serious injuries

READ MORE: New ICBC rate structure moves ahead

If significant symptoms still exist 12 months post-accident, the injury cap will no longer exist.

ICBC worked with medical experts, including the Doctors of BC voluntary medical association, as the province reduces the auto insurance corporation’s debt and exponential spending.

Doctors of BC president Dr. Eric Cadesky said changes such as pre-authorized accident benefits and new forms for patients post-accident will avoid the duplication of work and streamline the process.

“Eliminating unnecessary paperwork also allows doctors to spend more time with our patients.,” Cadesky said.

Other changes include wage loss payments increasing from $300 per week to $700, an increase to home support benefits and funeral cost payments rising to $7,500 from $2,500.


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

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