Participants in last year’s walk, which raised around $1,000. File photo.

Participants in last year’s walk, which raised around $1,000. File photo.

108 Mile Ranch Lions Club hoping to raise money for dog guides during a walking fundraiser

It costs roughly $25,000 to raise, train and place a dog guide

The 108 Mile Lions are hosting a dog walk in an effort to raise money for the Lions Foundation of Canada Dog Guides on May 27, starting at the 100 Mile House Visitors Centre.

“Dog Guides are more than just for visually-impaired and hearing impaired, they are also now for autism, they are for depression, for diabetes,” said Ingrid Meyer, the director of membership for the 108 Mile Lions Club.

Meyer spoke of a local who has applied for a dog and she said getting one dog to a family costs about $25,000 to raise and train. The dogs are provided at no cost to a family or person.

The foundation operates a national training school to breed the dogs, specializing in seven programs; canine vision, hearing, seizure response, service, autism assistance, diabetic alert and career change. The $25,000 is raised through donations from individuals, foundations, corporations and service clubs.

Dogs are trained in different skills, such as being able to open doors or sniff out low-blood sugar or detecting an incoming seizure depending on what stream they are in.

When a successful applicant receives a dog, its trainer will come with it until the canine is adjusted and has learned the routine and what to do for the person in need.

All the money raised during the walk, which will start at 11 a.m. and go until 3 p.m., will be going directly to the foundation’s headquarters in Oakville, Ont.

“It’s all going to the cause,” said Meyer. “It’s always going to the main organization in Ontario. We get all the money together but they distribute it throughout Canada.”

Vendors and possibly a food truck will also be at the Visitors Centre. According to Meyer, the vendors will donate some of their income to the cause.

This is the second time the 108 Lions Club will be hosting the event in 100 Mile House.

“It’s more accessible for all the handicapped people and the people with car problems, so 100 Mile House is a much better location,” she said.

The walk will follow the wetland trails. Registration for the walk will start at noonish and the walk will start at 1 p.m.

People can also drop off donations if they do not want to participate in the walk.


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