This May, Thariq and his family will lace up for one of BC Children’s Hospital Foundation’s signature events, RBC Race for the Kids: Home Edition. For 35 years, BC’s largest family fun run has pushed the limits of what’s possible in childhood cancer and mental health care.

This May, Thariq and his family will lace up for one of BC Children’s Hospital Foundation’s signature events, RBC Race for the Kids: Home Edition. For 35 years, BC’s largest family fun run has pushed the limits of what’s possible in childhood cancer and mental health care.

After battling cancer, a family rallies to help others in need

Register today for the RBC Race for the Kids: Home Edition

Shawna Imeson will never forget the day in the winter of 2018 that her life was forever changed. While she sat in a room with her husband and a team of specialists at BC Children’s Hospital, she received news that brought her to her knees: her three-year-old son had cancer.

“It was a heart-wrenching, stomach-twisting moment,” she recalled. “Since then, our family has been through awful moments – but I would take those over hearing ‘your son has cancer’ again.”

Weeks earlier, Thariq had a slight fever. At first, his parents thought it was a flu – but his symptoms became so severe that he could barely stand. Thariq was rushed to BC Children’s Hospital, where he was diagnosed with stage 4, high-risk neuroblastoma, a rare form of childhood cancer that begins in nerve tissue.

“I remember every night for that first month falling asleep and hoping that this was a bad dream,” Shawna said. “While trying to process how sick our boy was, we also had to discuss treatment.”

Experts at BC Children’s Hospital quickly developed an intensive plan that included chemotherapy, stem cell transplants, radiation and immunotherapy, which harnesses the body’s immune system to fight cancer. Over the next 18 months, Thariq endured 50 blood transfusions, four bone marrow biopsies, endless needle pokes, and hundreds of nights spent away from home.

Eventually, the treatment plan worked. In July, Thariq was declared in remission. Fast forward to today, and the six-year-old is now in kindergarten and living each day to the fullest. Thariq’s family is forever grateful for the care they received at BC Children’s Hospital – so when they learned they could help other kids and families battling childhood illnesses, they immediately stepped forward.

This spring, the whole family will be lacing up their runners to take part in one of BC Children’s Hospital Foundation’s signature events, RBC Race for the Kids: Home Edition. For 35 years, BC’s largest family fun run has pushed the limits of what’s possible in childhood cancer and mental health care. And for the second year, it’s being held as a virtual race that includes a month’s worth of fun-filled activities to help families stay healthy throughout May, as well as a race day celebration on June 6 that registrants can join from the comfort of their homes.

By registering for RBC Race for the Kids, supporters are helping advance childhood cancer programs and research, such as studies aimed at bringing novel therapies to the 20 per cent of kids with cancer who don’t respond to traditional treatments. Funds also support critical mental health initiatives at BC Children’s Hospital, ensuring kids from across the province – including for the 70 per cent with mental health challenges who don’t have the expert care they need – gain access to mental health resources and care.

“Donors played such an important part in helping us through our journey,” Shawna said. “We’re thrilled to have the chance to support other kids and families, while we have fun and stay active as a family.”

Register for RBC Race for the Kids at raceforthekidsbc.com.

BC Cancer FoundationFamiliesHealth and wellness

 

By registering for RBC Race for the Kids, supporters help advance childhood cancer programs and research, and support critical mental health initiatives at BC Children’s Hospital.

By registering for RBC Race for the Kids, supporters help advance childhood cancer programs and research, and support critical mental health initiatives at BC Children’s Hospital.

Just Posted

A woman wears a protective face covering to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 as she walks past the emergency entrance of Vancouver General Hospital in Vancouver, B.C., Friday, April 9, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
54 more cases of COVID-19 in Interior Health

Thirty-two people in the region are in hospital with the virus, 11 of them in intensive care

BC Wildfire Service crew member Josh Hutchinson participated in a controlled burn above the Williams Lake Stampede Grounds on Tuesday, April 20 that was conducted in concert with the Williams Lake Fire Department. It was a good weather day for the burn, as on Wednesday, April 21, the BCWS is urging caution, with strong winds in the forecast Wednesday and Thursday for the region. (Monica Lamb-Yorski photo - Williams Lake Tribune)
Cariboo Fire Centre urges caution against outdoor burning due to strong winds forecast

Public, industry asked to consider postponing burning until calmer weather

Cathy McLeod (File Photo)
McLeod disappointed with first federal budget in two years

The 2021 Federal Budget released Monday, April 19 is “disappointing and politically opportunistic,”

A two-hectare fire is burning between Canim Lake and Hawkins Lake. (Photo submitted).
Homeowners urged to be cautious with outdoor burning

Multiple fires, tinder-dry conditions good reminders to be vigilant.

B.C. Finance Minister Selina Robinson outlines the province’s three-year budget in Victoria, April 20, 2021. (B.C. government video)
B.C. deficit to grow by $19 billion for COVID-19 recovery spending

Pandemic-year deficit $5 billion lower than forecast

A large crowd protested against COVID-19 measures at Sunset Beach in Vancouver on Tuesday, April 20, 2021. (Snapchat)
VIDEO: Large, police-patrolled crowds gather at Vancouver beach for COVID protests

Vancouver police said they patrolled the area and monitored all gatherings

FILE – The Instagram app is shown on an iPhone in Toronto on Monday, March 19, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graeme Roy
Judge acquits B.C. teen boy ‘set up’ on sex assault charge based on Instagram messages

The girl and her friends did not have ‘good intentions’ towards the accused, judge says

Kai Palkeinen recently helped a car stuck on the riverbed near the Big Eddy Bridge. While the car could not be saved, some of the driver’s belongings were. It’s common for vehicles to get stuck in the area due to significantly changing river levels from Revelstoke Dam. (Photo by Kai Palkeinen)
“I just sank a car’: Revelstoke resident tries to save vehicle from the Columbia River

Although it’s not permitted, the riverbed near the city is popular for off roading

Meng Wanzhou, chief financial officer of Huawei, walks down the street with an acquaintance after leaving B.C. Supreme Court during a lunch break at her extradition hearing, in Vancouver, B.C., Thursday, April 1, 2021. A judge is scheduled to release her decision today on a request to delay the final leg of hearings in Meng Wanzhou’s extradition case. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Rich Lam
B.C. judge grants Meng Wanzhou’s request to delay extradition hearings

Lawyers for Canada’s attorney general had argued there is no justification to delay proceedings in the case

B.C. Premier John Horgan announces travel restrictions between the province’s regional health authorities at the legislature, April 19, 2021. (B.C. government photo)
B.C. sees 862 more COVID-19 cases Wednesday, seven deaths

Recreational travel restrictions set to begin Friday

B.C. Finance Minister Selina Robinson is photographed following her budget speech in the legislative assembly at the provincial legislature in Victoria, Tuesday, April 20, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito
B.C. budget lacks innovative drive, vision during uncertain times, say experts

Finance Minister Selina Robinson’s budget sets out to spend $8.7 billion over three years on infrastructure

Using panels kept cold by water circulating within them, B.C. researchers compared thermal comfort in 60 of the world’s most populous cities, including Toronto. (Lea Ruefenacht)
B.C. researchers use air conditioning to combat spread of COVID particles

Dr. Adam Rysanek and his team have proven a new worthwhile system – a mixture of cooling panels and natural ventilation

Police road checks are coming for people travelling between regions while COVID-19 travel restrictions are in place. (Black Press file photo)
B.C. clarifies COVID-19 travel restrictions, Lower Mainland a single zone

Vehicle checks on highways, at ferry terminals to start Friday

Most Read