Young trapper pursues passion in Lone Butte

Jane Schattenkirk is pursuing her love of taxidermy in Lone Butte. (Kelly Sinoski photo - 100 Mile Free Press).Jane Schattenkirk is pursuing her love of taxidermy in Lone Butte. (Kelly Sinoski photo - 100 Mile Free Press).
Jane Schattenkirk is pursuing her love of taxidermy in Lone Butte. (Kelly Sinoski photo - 100 Mile Free Press).Jane Schattenkirk is pursuing her love of taxidermy in Lone Butte. (Kelly Sinoski photo - 100 Mile Free Press).
Jane Schattenkirk is pursuing her love of taxidermy in Lone Butte. (Kelly Sinoski photo - 100 Mile Free Press).Jane Schattenkirk is pursuing her love of taxidermy in Lone Butte. (Kelly Sinoski photo - 100 Mile Free Press).
Jane Schattenkirk is pursuing her love of taxidermy in Lone Butte. (Kelly Sinoski photo - 100 Mile Free Press).Jane Schattenkirk is pursuing her love of taxidermy in Lone Butte. (Kelly Sinoski photo - 100 Mile Free Press).
Jane Schattenkirk is pursuing her love of taxidermy in Lone Butte. (Kelly Sinoski photo - 100 Mile Free Press).Jane Schattenkirk is pursuing her love of taxidermy in Lone Butte. (Kelly Sinoski photo - 100 Mile Free Press).
Jane Schattenkirk is pursuing her love of taxidermy in Lone Butte. (Kelly Sinoski photo - 100 Mile Free Press).Jane Schattenkirk is pursuing her love of taxidermy in Lone Butte. (Kelly Sinoski photo - 100 Mile Free Press).
Jane Schattenkirk is pursuing her love of taxidermy in Lone Butte. (Kelly Sinoski photo - 100 Mile Free Press).Jane Schattenkirk is pursuing her love of taxidermy in Lone Butte. (Kelly Sinoski photo - 100 Mile Free Press).

Jane Schattenkirk was a bored high schooler when she discovered taxidermy.

The young woman was reading a university textbook on ornithology when she came across some information on how to dissect birds. As luck would have it, she found a dead crow on the side of the road that same day.

“My mom was like ‘there is no way you are bringing that anywhere near the house.’ I grabbed it and brought it in the house,” Schattenkirk, 21, said. “I bring it home and skin this thing out and tried to taxidermy it. The maggots got into and I hucked that thing out in the forest but I kind of caught the bug.

“It was so fascinating just dissecting the animal and seeing how it worked.”

Schattenkirk had been living in the Lower Mainland but was so enthralled with taxidermy that she decided to move to Lone Butte to pursue her trapping passion.

“I was raised anti-fur. My whole family was against hunting and trapping. I don’t know where the heck I got it from but I really wanted to hunt and trap,” she said. “It’s hard to source pelts if you’re not going out and getting them. That’s how I get most of my pelts, by collecting them on my property.”

Although she has yet to get on a trapline, she has been able to secure a few furs on the market, as well as through snares. The odd pelt has been obtained by shooting animals – a lynx that killed her chickens and a weasel that took the heads of her quail – on her property.

“This one was shot eating my ducks,” she said, pointing at a lynx fur. “I snared most of these. I bought quite a few of the other ones. I did a lot of purchasing from local trappers especially when pelt prices were really low so I could have these as part of my collection.”

Schattenkirk said she sees trapping as a way to manage the land by controlling overpopulations of animals such as wolves.



kelly.sinoski@100milefreepress.net

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

100 Mile House