South Cariboo Food Security Committee holds a gleaning

Nearly 800 pounds of vegetables harvested for vulnerable families

Several volunteers participated in the South Cariboo Food Security Committee's first gleaning event at Paul and Cindy Whitehead's farm near Forest Grove on Oct. 3. The enthusiastic group harvested close to 800 pounds of vegetables in two hours.

Several volunteers participated in the South Cariboo Food Security Committee's first gleaning event at Paul and Cindy Whitehead's farm near Forest Grove on Oct. 3. The enthusiastic group harvested close to 800 pounds of vegetables in two hours.

The South Cariboo Food Security Committee’s (SCFSC) first gleaning event at Paul and Cindy Whitehead’s farm near Forest Grove was a great success.

Gleaning is the act of collecting leftover crops from farmers’ fields, SCFSC chair Lisa De Paoli says, adding it is a community and work-centred activity – a social safety net for those in need.

On Oct. 3, an enthusiastic group of volunteers harvested 450 pounds of potatoes, 60 pounds of beets, 40 pounds of carrots, and 30 pounds of cabbage in just two hours.

Many thanks go to Whiteheads for donating extra produce from their garden to support vulnerable families throughout this winter.

Thanks also go to Rod and Ann Granger for providing storage in their root cellar.

Thanks are extended to all of the volunteers: Debbra Williams, Rod McDonald, Chris Pettman, Ava Pettman, Sylvia Peniuk, Noella Andrews, Bruce Madu, Gordon Hoglund, Mary Jeffery, Rusty Martin, and Cindy and Paul Whitehead.

We hope to have many more gleaning events next year, says SCFSC vice-chair Rita Giesbrecht.

The committee meets every second Thursday of the month from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m.

Please contact De Paoli at 250-395-5155 or by e-mail at ldepaoli@cariboofamily.org, or Giesbrecht at 250-791-6631 or by e-mail at rita@chrisharris.com if you would like more information about the committee or are interested in joining.

The SCFSC is also interested in ideas about how the South Cariboo can create a sustainable food system for all, Giesbrecht adds.