Volunteer Elsie Urquhart sorts through new book donations in the thrift shop, which has hundreds of books up for grabs. (Melissa Smalley photo - 100 Mile Free Press)

Volunteer Elsie Urquhart sorts through new book donations in the thrift shop, which has hundreds of books up for grabs. (Melissa Smalley photo - 100 Mile Free Press)

SMAC haven for treasure-seekers

Centre offers thrift store, far-reaching support

It’s hard to know where to start treasure hunting at the Seventy Mile Access Centre.

To the left is a book room, shelves crammed with used novels, sorted by author, which a volunteer works diligently to sort and market with stickers based on genre. Straight ahead, the corridor is lined with knickknacks, paintings, vases and ornaments. A peek through an open door reveals a games room – stuffed sky-high with hundreds of DVDs, CDs, records, board games, puzzles and VHS movies – while behind another are the comforts of home: furniture, pillows, and even an old Bingo sign affixed high on the wall.

“It’s always a busy day here,” says SMAC spokesperson Kathleen Judd, as she walks briskly to the gymnasium, to a stack of recently donated items waiting to be sorted.

Volunteers buzz from room to room, making sure not to get in the way of those on the hunt for treasures in the centre, a former elementary school. The busiest room contains racks of gently-used clothes, where bargain-hunters can fill a garbage bag full of shirts, pants, sweaters and dresses for only $10.

“I love it, this place is awesome,” says shopper Devin Holt, as he pays for a pile of new-to-him work clothes. “It’s such a good deal.”

The thrift store, open Wednesdays and Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., is a big draw for the public – on the day the Free Press visited, there was a steady lineup of shoppers waiting to get inside. But it only represents a small fraction of what takes place at SMAC on any given day.

The centre has become a hub of the community, offering far-reaching support to anyone in need – near and far, Judd explained. It offers everything from weekly food hampers to local residents to baby clothes for underprivileged families in Mexico. New toys are collected throughout the year for families at Christmastime, donations are made to the local women’s shelter, support is offered to fire victims who need the basics to get back on their feet, and grocery cards and gas cards are also available to those struggling to make ends meet.

READ MORE: Community hall taking shape in 70 Mile House

“We don’t need to know the circumstances, in fact we don’t want to know,” Judd said. “We don’t intrude on their privacy at all.”

As a completely self-funded non-profit, SMAC relies heavily on generous donations from the public – which Judd describes as “overwhelming” – as well as a dedicated team of volunteers who keep the place running.

On the days the thrift store is open, there are usually five or six volunteers on duty, ringing up customers, sorting through books, assisting shoppers and manning the door. On the other days, the team puts together food hampers, sifts through donations and reorganizes various rooms.

“It’s not a normal 20-hour week,” Judd points out, adding there is an enormous amount of contribution that takes place behind the scenes as well.

“We have people offering to bring their trucks or trailers to load up and take things to the dump, or other people who come in and give us a cheque for $200. Those are the people you don’t see.”

And while the volunteers at the centre work hard, they don’t forget to have fun and approach their work with a sense of humour.

When asked what the strangest item was they had come across in their donation boxes, Judd answers without hesitation.

“Oh, our sex toys would be the strangest things that come through the door. It happens quite often,” Judd said with a laugh, explaining that boxes full of mysterious wares from rental houses are often dropped off.

“We do giggle about those, that’s for sure. It cheers up our seniors.”

While the centre has had to scale back many of its activities this year due to COVID-19 restrictions – weekly soup and coffee offerings and pickle ball are currently on hold, to name a few – the past two years have seen a lot of growth for the non-profit, something Judd hopes carries on in the future.

She said the group has aspirations to make the centre an access point during any sort of emergency, a muster point for safely housing evacuees or offering an information centre.

Judd said they are looking at ways to co-ordinate with the RCMP and other emergency services in the area to explore that possibility. With the generosity of the community she has witnessed up until now, Judd said SMAC’s future looks bright.

“It’s just amazing what the community does for us and what we have managed to achieve – people are really beginning to appreciate it.”



melissa,smalley@100milefreepress.net

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A small sampling of some of the movies for sale at the SMAC thrift store. (Melissa Smalley photo - 100 Mile Free Press)

A small sampling of some of the movies for sale at the SMAC thrift store. (Melissa Smalley photo - 100 Mile Free Press)

The clothing room at the SMAC thrift store is often bustling with shoppers. (Melissa Smalley photo - 100 Mile Free Press)

The clothing room at the SMAC thrift store is often bustling with shoppers. (Melissa Smalley photo - 100 Mile Free Press)

Volunteer Kathy Perrin rings up shopper Devin Holt’s purchase in the thrift store clothing room. (Melissa Smalley photo - 100 Mile Free Press)

Volunteer Kathy Perrin rings up shopper Devin Holt’s purchase in the thrift store clothing room. (Melissa Smalley photo - 100 Mile Free Press)

Ken Grant sweeps up in the gymnasium, where newly donated items are held for 48 hours before being sorted and put away. (Melissa Smalley - 100 Mile Free Press)

Ken Grant sweeps up in the gymnasium, where newly donated items are held for 48 hours before being sorted and put away. (Melissa Smalley - 100 Mile Free Press)

It’s the holiday season all year round in the thrift store’s Christmas room, where Christmas decorations of all shapes and sizes can be found. (Melissa Smalley photo - 100 Mile Free Press)

It’s the holiday season all year round in the thrift store’s Christmas room, where Christmas decorations of all shapes and sizes can be found. (Melissa Smalley photo - 100 Mile Free Press)

Rick Willick assists Kathleen Judd in selecting a door prize winner. (Melissa Smalley photo - 100 Mile Free Press)

Rick Willick assists Kathleen Judd in selecting a door prize winner. (Melissa Smalley photo - 100 Mile Free Press)

A large, wall-mounted bingo sign is one of many unique finds at SMAC’s thrift store. (Melissa Smalley photo - 100 Mile Free Press)

A large, wall-mounted bingo sign is one of many unique finds at SMAC’s thrift store. (Melissa Smalley photo - 100 Mile Free Press)

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