Green Lake Snowmobile Club hosted successful information and fun day

Community news happening around the South Green Lake area

A Mormon youth group from the Lower Mainland used the Green Lake Snowmobile Club property to re-enact the journey their ancestors took and got a bit of feel for the hardships they endured while crossing the plains of the United States as pioneers.

A Mormon youth group from the Lower Mainland used the Green Lake Snowmobile Club property to re-enact the journey their ancestors took and got a bit of feel for the hardships they endured while crossing the plains of the United States as pioneers.

The Green Lake Snowmobile Club Information and Fun Day was a great success with about 100 people attending throughout the day.

There was a 50/50 draw and the winner of $150 was Heide Rasmussen. There was also a chance to win a free Snowmobile Club membership for folks who paid in advance and the winners were Jerry and Darrel Rogers.

This event was mainly held to inform the public about the rules and regulations of the Snowmobile and ATV trails that extend for hundreds of miles throughout our area and into the Chilcotin.

Bev Horsnell talked about the type of insurance needed and new safety regulations for all off-road vehicles for the upcoming years.

Forestry representative Steve Law discussed the development of the Gold Rush Trail being rebuilt behind the 70 Mile Motel, which runs north and south.

Larry Messaros, Peter McKie and other members also explained the complexity of maintaining these trails and the hundreds of volunteer hours put in clearing debris.

The club offers great dances throughout the winter in the clubhouse, as well as many other winter activities.

The clubhouse is for rent at reasonable rates and members get a discount.

For more ATV and snowmobile club information, contact Larry Messaros at editor@greenlakesnowmobile club.ca, or go to www.ATVBC.ca.

 

TREKing across the Prairies

The Green Lake Snowmobile Clubhouse on South Green Lake Road was having an interesting event last week.

Tammy Kennedy is a volunteer leader of a Mormon youth group for teens 14-18 years from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints,

She is from the Heritage Museum in Burnaby and says she was leading the youth group which was re-enacting the lives of those pioneers who landed in New York and Boston during 1865.

“We came here this year because we heard Green Lake was noted for having very little rain this time of year,” she says, adding their assistant trail boss Peter Glosli’s parents live at the 108 Mile Ranch.

The pioneers would only to take a train as far as Iowa and Salt Lake City and then started their journey by hand cart, crossing the prairies.

Recreating the daily hardships that many of their ancestors had, the youth group used the handmade carts and only allowed to take 17 pounds (as was the limit allowed at that time) of personal items. They are rationed food, some cooked in dutch ovens, for three days, as if they had gone back in time.

They were taught about the hardships of death on the plains and learned to appreciate what they have today in comparison to those striving to survive with almost nothing.  Each child was told to look up a relative of that time, write a story remembering past events about them, how they lived through hardships and later make a leather bracelet with that relatives name on it in their honour.  All the leaders, volunteers and children were dressed in period costumes.

They had Spenser Rozell, a real blacksmith from Chilliwack, teach them about shoeing horses and other things he would make for their journey.

They also had a general store and print shop. Angie Greenfield of Green Lake was the Pony Express representative who delivered mail to them.

This was truly an awesome experience for youth of today and it’s impressive to see the amount of volunteer work that went into it

For more interesting information about these youth groups who travel to different places in British Columbian, go to www.history.lds.org and click on Overland Journey.