Conservation officer Darcy MacPhee wanted to find the hunter who killed and left this grizzly near Mt. Timothy. (Jonathan Green photo - from the Free Press archives)

Conservation officer Darcy MacPhee wanted to find the hunter who killed and left this grizzly near Mt. Timothy. (Jonathan Green photo - from the Free Press archives)

ARCHIVES: CO looks for whoever killed a grizzly bear

From the Free Press archives

52 YEARS AGO (1970): Music lovers and community supporters got together on Nov. 26 for the first-ever community concert in 100 Mile House. Bands, schools, church choirs, vocalists and instrumentalists from 100 Mile House, Lone Butte, Forest Grove, 70 Mile and 93 Mile were on the program. Organizer Mrs. Gordon Ireland said the program was “shaping up beautifully. I’m getting excited.” She came up with the idea of the concert to celebrate Canada’s Music Week after being invited to Quesnel by the Music Teacher’s Federation before deciding to organize one for the local area.

39YEARS AGO (1983): With highways crews on strike and snow-covered roads getting icy, two concerned Anderson subdivision housewives, Anne Dale and Cathy Rymer decided to take matters into their own hands. They loaded up their four-wheel drive trucks with sand, recruited some enthusiastic shovelers and began spreading the sand near Skaday Bridge and around the Lone Butte area. Within hours, Dale had compiled a list of over 50 volunteers wanting to help out.

26 YEARS AGO (1996): Conservation Officer Darcy MacPhee said the local office was looking for whoever was responsible for killing a three-year-old grizzly. What was left of the body was found the week before near Fly Lake in the vicinity of Mt. Timothy ski hill. MacPhee believes the bear came across a hunting camp where a moose was hanging beside the camp, most likely attracting the bear. MacPhee said the bear was probably shot then wandered off and died some 50 metres away. He believes those responsible left the area instead of owning up to the act.

13 YEARS AGO (2009): Judith Hayes was surprised when she received a toll bill for crossing the new Golden Ears Bridge as she was not in the Lower Mainland on the day she supposedly crossed the bridge. Instead, she was at work at Community Employment Services in 100 Mile House. “This is totally bogus. I was at work and nobody else was driving my vehicle,” said Hayes, adding it was not the bill for $3.90 that was the issue, rather it was the principle. TransLink communications director Ken Hardie said it could have been a glitch. “It does happen. It is accurate 97 per cent of the time.”


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