Peter Skene Ogden Secondary School student Terrance Hubick Archie. (Millar Hill - 100 Mile Free Press)

Peter Skene Ogden Secondary School student Terrance Hubick Archie. (Millar Hill - 100 Mile Free Press)

A bright future for Canim Lake area high school student

‘I want to be that one person who gives back to the community’

Peter Skene Ogden Secondary School (PSO) student Terrance Hubick Archie naturally came into the role of helping others as a child.

Growing up, Archie says there wasn’t always a figure for him to look up to, but as he grew older he knew that he could be the kind of person who was absent in his fundamental years.

“My mother is the only parent I have and she’s always been there whenever I needed her,” said Archie. “We grew up helping one another out. It’s always been my job, well, not my job but I naturally took that on.”

Archie volunteers a lot of his time with the youth in the Canim Lake area. Each year, he volunteers during Eliza Archie Elementary School’s jamboree. He says he also will go on trips with the kids for them to experience new things like going to the Lower Mainland to fish hatcheries and more.

“I like to show them as much as I know,” said Archie. “I do as much as I can for them.”

Archie said volunteering has helped him become a more confident person because it’s encouraged him to step outside of his comfort zone.

“It’s always been a big help,” said Archie. “I attend a lot of powwows and volunteer there too. It takes a lot for one community to host a powwow. A lot of communities like to keep it traditional and it takes a lot of work. I like to help out because it’s a relief in the community, especially from someone young.”

Archie volunteers on a weekly basis whether it’s at an event, spending time with youth or with where ever he can help out.

“Being involved in the community has always helped my family move on,” said Archie. “Getting yourself out in the community and being welcomed, really makes you feel a part of it.”

Archie’s volunteering efforts took him to the 2008 North American Indigenous Games where he participated in the opening drumming ceremony. Archie was the youngest volunteer then and has since been a part of the games.

“My mother pushed me to be a better person, she didn’t want me growing up in a bad environment,” said Archie. “Without that, I think I would be looked at differently. I have taken the role to step up, be noticed and it’s helped. The more connections I make, the more I feel welcome.”

This is Archie’s final year at PSO. After school, he says he would eventually like to have a career in Aboriginal policing.

“I want to go to places that need it the most,” said Archie. “I want to be that one person who gives back to the community.”


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